Tag Archives: artist

Featured Artist: Sterling Hundley

After a short absence, our regular artistic feature returns to the website. Today Kureen is honoured to share the work of illustrator, writer, painter and entrepreneur Sterling Hundley.

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Sterling Hundley’s images pay homage to fellow American N.C. Wyeth’s famous illustrations for the 1911 edition of Treasure Island published by Scribner and Sons.

Hundley’s illustrations focus on moments of dramatic tension in the text. His subjects are captured in mid-motion and rendered in a palette of sombre colours and textures that capture the violent undertones of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic text.

The judges of the 2015 V&A Illustration Awards were mesmerised by this book and described it as: “Richly coloured, atmospheric and stylistically consistent”

Hundley is currently Associate Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond Virginia.

His mixed media approach combines traditional oil painting with  digital image editing in Photoshop; a technique that, he hopes, updates and repackages Treasure Island for a 21st century audience.

Text courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum of art and design.

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To see more of Sterling Hundley’s work visit his website —> HERE <—

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Sound Bite: Undecided Arts Collective

DxK is joined by Mark Dickson who discusses being part of a collective.

To take a peek at the Undecided Arts Collective Facebook page click —> HERE

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Featured Artist – Katie Rivers

During my life I have stepped across the paths of many people with the surname ‘Rivers;’

Dan Rivers a fine chap with straight edge inclinations.
Lewis Riversthe brother of a fine chap with Straight Edge inclinations.
Joan Riversthe love of my life.

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Yet none have been so artistically delectable as one Katie Yelda Zeretski Rivers, a performance artist,  painter, carpenter and Michelin star chef, who insists that she wasn’t the one who stole the balsa wood from the Blue Peter garden in 1998.

At 24 she has the world at her fingertips, with the callouses on the underside of her hands testament to a relentless work ethic that has only temporarily been curbed due to her relatively new surroundings.

Now residing in Queenstown, New Zealand, Katie is granted easy access to some of the most aesthetically stunning landscapes in the world on a daily basis; only the emotionless could fail to find splendour in the cacophony of conspicuous mountains, lakes and clear skies that make the town one of the crown jewels of Oceania.

With the incredible spectrum of content within Ms Rivers’ portfolio, it’s obvious that she’s one to watch in the art world over the next few years, with a captivating personality backing up some serious and varied creative talent.

To take a peek at Katie Rivers’ website simply click anywhere on this paragraph!

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Featured Artist – Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh was born Vincent Willem van Gogh on March 30, 1853, in Groot-Zundert, Netherlands.

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His father, Theodorus van Gogh, was an austere country minister, and his mother, Anna Cornelia Carbentus, was a moody artist whose love of nature, drawing and watercolours was transferred to her son.

Van Gogh was born exactly one year after his parents’ first son, also named Vincent, was stillborn. At a young age—his name and birth date already etched on his dead brother’s headstone—the artist was melancholy.

In the fall of 1880, van Gogh decided to move to Brussels and become an artist. Though he had no formal art training, his younger brother Theo, who worked as an art dealer, offered to support him financially.

He began taking lessons on his own, studying books like Travaux des champs by Jean-François Millet and Cours de dessin by Charles Bargue.

Van Gogh had a catastrophic love life. He was attracted to women in trouble, thinking he could help them. His cousin, Kate, was recently widowed, and when van Gogh fell in love with her, she was repulsed and fled to her home in Amsterdam.

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He then moved to The Hague and fell in love with Clasina Maria Hoornik, an alcoholic prostitute. She became his companion, mistress and model.

When Hoornik went back to prostitution, van Gogh became utterly depressed. In 1882, his family threatened to cut off his money unless he left Hoornik and The Hague.

Van Gogh left in mid-September of that year to travel to Drenthe, a somewhat desolate district in the Netherlands. For the next six weeks, he lived a nomadic life, moving throughout the region while drawing and painting the landscape and its people.

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After more than 100 years since van Gogh’s death, more of his artwork was released. A painting of a landscape entitled “Sunset at Montmajour” was discovered and unveiled by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam in September 2013.

Before coming under the possession of the Van Gogh Museum, a Norwegian industrialist owned the painting, storing it away in his attic, doubting that it was authentic.

The painting is believed to have been created by van Gogh in 1888—around the same time that his artwork “Sunflowers” was made—just two years before his death.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Featured Artist – Imogen Rogers

 

A combination of terrible hostel Wi-Fi and lack of laptop time over Easter conspired to delay the gallery for April’s artist of the month.

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This month’s featured creative talent is Imogen Rogers, somebody whose paintings I randomly stumbled across during a soiree to Magnetic Island in Australia recently. I was instantly taken aback by the way the artist captured so many emotions with ostensibly simple concepts.

In her own words;

My artwork is all about inner expression. That you can take your thoughts that trigger feelings and give them a voice.

The process is a lived experience; also allowing the stillness which speaks once you have put a space around constant thoughts.

If I can produce a painting when I am feeling down it gives me solace; if I can produce a piece when I am feeling good then I want to share that with other people.

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To get in touch with Imogen simply click here for her Facebook page and website.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Zoe Sadler Interview

Each month here at Kureen we shed the spotlight on a talented artist. In March our featured gallery comes from illustrator, author and beanie hat aficionado Zoe Sadler, who kindly agreed to take time out of her busy schedule to answer some of our questions.

Zoe with an image from her children's book, 'The Lighthouse Keeper'
Zoe with an image from her children’s book, ‘The Lighthouse Keeper’

Kureen: Hi Zoe, your gallery looks mighty fine – how would you describe your art work to someone who hasn’t seen it?

Zoe: A whimsical take on the everyday and ordinary. I like to take things from reality and make them a little bit extraordinary. It often means things in my world are a little bit quirky and very often a bit wonky too!

Smeaton TowerK:  You add a sprinkle of wanderlust by the sounds of it! You’re also a published children’s author, what’s the story behind the… story?

Z: A children’s book is something I wanted to do for a while.

I took inspiration for the story from where I live, Freshwater Bay, and a Lighthouse which features often in my work (inspired by Smeaton’s Tower in Plymouth, pictured right, where Zoe went to University.)

I also wanted to do something really amazing for my portfolio so utilised a Kickstarter project to fund the publication of the book. Also, the lighthouse keeper character in the book accidentally kind of resembles my Dad – Just don’t tell him that!

 

K: The book’s title is The Lighthouse Keeper: A cautionary Tale for anyone interested in taking a peek. With regards to the success of the book, it was released less than a year ago and of 250 published copies only three remain unsold – has that exceeded your expectations?

Z: Definitely – the response to the book has been amazing! I had so much support, particularly on the island. I really appreciated the chance to get my teeth into a great project. Particularly one which gave me the opportunity to publish my first children’s book, which is a dream come true for me! I hope to start a new story in the next few months as well.

 

K: It’s inspiring for any aspiring authors based on the Island to see your success. You haven’t always been on these shores, you were born in Scotland, how did you end up as an adopted ‘Caulkhead’?

Z: Thank you, it’s nice to contribute creatively to the island!

I struggled to find my feet in Scotland after finishing my illustration degree in Dundee. I found a post-grad course in Publishing at Plymouth as I wanted to learn more about the industry which led me to my first job working as a children’s illustrator for a small publisher in London.

I also met my partner while in Plymouth, so one day we just thought where would we like to live? We are lucky enough with our jobs we can live anywhere. We visited the island a few times and decided it was the place for us, particularly Freshwater. It reminds me more of my Scottish home but it’s slightly warmer!

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K: What’s the arts scene like over here compared to north of the border?

Z: It’s changed a lot over the last ten years. It was quite hard to make a mark being so far from London when I was there. If I was there now maybe I would have found my feet much quicker. I like to keep up to date with things that are going on, particularly around Dundee and Aberdeen. Dundee seems to have a really good contemporary art scene these days.

 

K: And I guess you pop up to the Edinburgh Fringe from time to time?

Z: Actually I have never been despite the fact that I have a few friends there. I’ve just never seem to have timed it right, but would love to make it there one day. I have however done some artwork for performances at the fringe- that is my only link so far.

 

K: Are there any particular Isle of Wight artists, sculptors or animators you hold in high esteem?

Z: I absolutely adore Gillian Connor’s driftwood creations! I have several in my house. I joke with her I have to put my blinkers on when I see her selling her work anywhere.

I also really like Chris Jenkins‘ sculptural work, his humanoid sculptures made from found objects and rubbish are brilliant!

Lighthouse KeeperK: You’re right, there’s a creative hub forming on the Isle, You spend a lot of time globe-trotting, does a lot of your illustration inspiration come from there?

Z: I have to admit I didn’t travel so much last year, but recently visited South Africa. and came back with some inspiration for new illustrations – perhaps some giraffes and lion characters from safari might appear in future books!

I take inspiration from everywhere I go. I am always looking at buildings and quirky shapes or trees and thinking there might be potential in that. If I don’t have a sketchbook I’ll take a quick photo to remember for later.

 

K: Changing tact slightly – beanie hats… You’re slightly obsessed eh?!

Z: Erm… Well you got me, I confess, of the knitted variety! I have an overflowing basket of knitted hats. If it’s cold you’ll probably see me in a home-made hat. My homely obsession has gone from knitting mittens to knitting hats, sad I know but I like to be warm and toastie! I even have one hat that has ears and antlers; I’m under strict instructions to wear it for Christmas only!

 

K: I think that deserves an airing for at least 11 months of the year! If not the aptly named Sarah Beeny (groan), who have been your influences in life and art?

Z: That is of course my opinion too, sadly others may not agree!

I am a huge fan of Tim Burton and you can more than likely see his influence within my work. I also love Edward Gorey‘s black and white gothic illustrations and rather macabre stories. I also love illustrators Quentin Blake, Maurice Sendak and David Roberts amongst many others. I also draw a lot of inspiration from classic fairytales.

I have also been lucky enough to have huge encouragement from my very much un-arty parents and a couple of very inspiring art teachers along the way!

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K: What’s one thing most people won’t know about you?

Z: Unless you know me well it’s probably that I have overcome crippling shyness. I can be quite chatty or very quiet! It’s only in the last few years I have come out of my shell and had the confidence to try things I never would have before. For instance I did a small book reading for the literary festival last year and chatted to a school group. Both took a lot of courage for me. I still can’t do talks or presentations in front of lots of people – it utterly terrifies me!

 

K: It’s like Jerry Seinfeld said – In a poll of people’s greatest fears ‘public speaking’ came first, ‘dying’ was 2nd… That means that if you’re at a funeral you’d rather be in the casket than reading the eulogy! With that said, you definitely come across as an assured person. How can people check out your upcoming projects or get in touch?

Z: Thanks that means a lot… Great analogy! You can find me on Facebook and Twitter for all my most current news and works in progress. I also have a website, blog and online shop.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Featured Artist: Zoe Sadler

Once there was a girl and one day she picked up a pen and a pot of ink…

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Zoe Sadler is an illustrator whose love of reading fairytales and penchant for her old-fashioned dip pen and pot of ink inspires her to create quirky hand drawn illustrations.

She was brought up on a small Scottish Croft in rural Aberdeenshire. In 2004 she graduated from Duncan and Jordanstone College of Art and Design in Dundee with a degree in Illustration.

Following this, she completed a postgraduate diploma in publishing at Plymouth University.

Zoe then worked as an illustrator and book designer, at a London book publisher, for two years. She now works from her studio on the picturesque and inspiring Isle of Wight as a freelance artist and illustrator.

When Zoe is not covered in black ink and hasn’t got her pen and ink to hand she can most often be seen drinking earl grey tea, obsessively knitting mittens or spotted out and about in her red wellies walking her black lab ‘Wilson’.

Interested in finding out more about Zoe? Simply click on the links below the gallery.

 

Take a look at Zoe’s website —-> here <— If you’re quick there might be a few copies of ‘The Lighthouse Keeper’ available to purchase!

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Featured Artist: Nightways

A kind and creative soul brought up in an alternative home, February’s featured artist has always looked to innovate rather then follow the mainstream.

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Nightways was formed in 2012 as an artistic persona, which has an on-going production based on bears and people as its protagonists. Under this persona, Night has performed at a number of events doing live graffiti painting and has sold his artwork with the dream of self development and one love under his hat

The Bear primarily represents strength and confidence, standing against adversity, taking action and leadership. The Bear emphasises the importance of solitude, quiet time and rest. The spirit of the bear provides strong grounding force.

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The human side allows us to bring emotions and body language into the pictures, enabling us to relate to and be inspired by these beautiful creatures.

Night’s pieces often depict characters found in meditation or astral travelling in space, in tune with universal energy, experiencing the unseen that connects us all. Fractals, yoga, positivity, higher and lower states of consciousness, urban aesthetics, hip-hop, equality & graffiti culture are other themes of his work.

Nightways had an illegal graffiti background in his early years before forming this new artist persona. He was in a team of anti social kids who got kicks out of painting their names in the city.

This graffiti upbringing is responsible for the artist he is today. Through this youthful creativeness and reformed outlook on life he has progressed his graffiti on paper to walls with an eagle eye for detail and dream like lucid patterns.

If you want to stay in tune with Nightways artworks progression you can like his page on Facebook, or sneak a peak at his Instagram!

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Featured Artist – Steve Miles

Originally from Warley in the West Midlands, Steve Miles moved to the Isle of Wight in 1994 and has worked as a Graphic Designer for various Island companies, including current employers Stainless Games Ltd. as a Graphic Designer and Artist on video games.

Steve Miles art

He began painting graffiti in the early 1980s under the tag Toxic363. and at an early age was introduced to what was, at the time, a little known cultural phenomenon from the States called ‘Hip Hop’.

Steve recalls: “My next door neighbour had an American cousin who came to visit one summer.

“He was a great break-dancer, and brought with him a magazine about Hip Hop that featured the now legendary Rock Steady Crew. I was not much good at the ‘breaking’, but was intrigued by the graffiti section of the article that featured the Bronx ‘writer’ Brim Fuentes.

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“I was really into drawing so I started to get in to the graff’, practising my own letters every day at school and often into the early hours of the morning at home, I was hooked like some kind of alphabet junkie!”

Spending his teenage years painting Graffiti, Steve found himself involved with various crews, most notably TIC (The Imperial Creations), an affiliation that endures today.

After leaving school in 1989, he worked for various companies in the print industry and learned the traditional processes at the time – pasting up artwork, making colour separations, working out type scales, etc – all of which now sound like processes from ancient history, following the advent of the digital print revolution that took place not very many years later.

Steve recalls:”It was a largely technical industry, which only marginally tallied with my real love – painting graffiti and making art.”

To contact Steve Miles or take a more detailed look at what he does please click on the links here for his website and Facebook

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Featured Artist: Andrea della Robbia

We’ve decided to break with tradition and go a bit left-field with this month’s artist, by featuring an Italian whose finest works were created in the mid-late 15th Century.

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Andrea della Robbia was the nephew and disciple of Luca della Robbia, who developed the blue and white glazes used on terracotta sculpture with which the name della Robbia is associated.

By the time he made the Lehman Madonna, circa 1470–75, Andrea had for some years been chiefly responsible for the output of the family shop in the via Guelfa, Florence.

Although he was a faithful follower of his uncle’s style, his own personality emerged in works such as his best known piece ‘Virgin and child’, with its exceptionally high relief, in which he achieved monumental forms without sacrificing any of that sweetness and harmony of expression for which Luca is so admired.

Click on any images in the gallery beneath to view a larger version, with the option to scroll through them via the arrows at either side.

 

For further information on the artist please take a look at this web gallery devoted to his works.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me.
I meditate and wash daily when possible.