Tag Archives: Brothers

July Playlist: Music Reviews

Jonathan O’Shea returns with a new monthly column reviewing the best music releases of the month. For July he’s selected a quartet of “must hear” tracks for Kureen subscribers to get their lug holes around.

Bodyline – Peaches

Ripe as ever, the pornographic priestess Peaches is back. Typically lascivious and with trademark urgency, ‘Bodyline’ is – somewhat disappointingly – not about the 1932/33 Ashes tour (ask your great-granddad). Instead, it’s more about her familiar themes of submitting to animalistic impulses and seeking personal freedom.

Implicit references to willies are fewer than usual, as the returning electro queen corrals the guitar skills of Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ Nick Zinner to augment her belligerent vocal style. Two-and-a-half minutes of insistent suggestiveness climaxes in wailing sirens on this interim single, released ahead of her forthcoming new album (released in September). As Peaches preaches: “Don’t knock it ‘til you try it”.

Go – The Chemical Brothers ft Q-Tip

Grand Old Dukes of electronica, The Chemical Brothers, are also back among the airwaves, re-uniting with rap royalty, Q-Tip (following up their impressive collaboration on 2008’s ‘Galvanize’). ‘Go’ begins amid frantic bongos and slashing light-sabres (honestly); and Q-Tip’s muscular rap provides the backbone for a familiar Daft Punk-style synth-a-thon.

This dancefloor-friendly slice is escorted by a characteristically oblique Michel Gondry video. Gondry, who has previously conjured magical moving images to accompany the sounds of (among others) the White Stripes, Metronomy and Paul McCartney, presents an alluring troupe of overgrown Oompa-Loompas practicing sailing drills/Morris dancing in a futuristic fortress. At least that’s my interpretation of it.

‘Cause I’m a Man – Tame Impala

Australia’s Tame Impala have received an avalanche of positive acclaim for their third album, ‘Currents’, which apparently expands their repertoire from psych-rock to electro, disco and new romanticism. This dreamy, 80s-flavoured Prince-esque letter of apology for being ‘typically male’ (i.e. acting before thinking) is a good indicator of the new direction.

The band’s musical mastermind, Kevin Parker, has stated his aim to hear their latest creations emanating from dancefloors – presumably rather than the bedroom windows of stoned students. This stylish slow groove could fulfil that wish in a last-song-of-the-night kind of way.

Dreams – Beck

Not another Fleetwood Mac cover, mercifully. But pop is constantly chewing on itself and, here, alt-veteran Beck serves up an MGMT-flecked melange: the song’s eclectic feel shamelessly recalls their ‘Electric Feel’. It works brilliantly; even threatening to infiltrate the ‘mainstream’ by featuring in TV ads and various musical montages of late.

Reminiscent of his upbeat ‘Guero’-era danceable demi-anthems, this track – devoted to the restorative power of dreams – is thickly layered with catchy aural confections. Never outstaying its welcome at five minutes, it’s surely the funksome highpoint of Beck’s meandering later career.

Also recommended this month

 

Kings Never Die – Eminem ft Gwen Stefani.

Comeback rant featuring boxing legend Riddick Bowe (in the lyrics, sadly not rapping.)

What Went Down – Foals.

Lung-bursting, stock-in-trade anthem by the ascendant kings of UK guitar music.

Them Changes – Thundercat.

Soul-stirring stuff from bass boss Stephen Bruner.

Tune in again next month to see which tracks J O’S selects as August’s top tunes. Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below!

Written by Jonathan O'Shea

A keen student of sport, music and life. Can generally be found educating small people, bitterly damning Aston Villa's latest attempts at football, or writing nonsense about ephemera.