Tag Archives: Carson

Isle of Wight: 30 Under 30

From the 1960’s through to the early ‘noughties’, the Isle of Wight was considered something of a production line for successful creatives. This was in part due to the prosperity of Level 42, The Bees, Jeremy Irons, Bear Grills, Anthony Minghella et al. Thereafter, the conveyor belt has been a  little less prolific.

The sweaty scent of resurgence is now in the air though, making it the perfect time to present a list of 30 gifted creatives under the age of 30 that are worth keeping your eyes, ears and nostrils peeled for in late 2017 and beyond. Please share your thoughts in the comment section below the article.

30. Hester Chambers – Singer/Songwriter

With breathy, Karen Carpenter-esque vocals, Hester Chambers has a simple, beautiful tone that is like marshmallow to the ears.

Ostensibly a bag of nerves right up until the moment she utters her first note, thereafter she morphs into a hauntingly captivating melody maker. Has most recently found a niche in collaboration with Summer festival royalty, the Plastic Mermaids.

29. Sam Morris – Musician

The BaDow bass guitarist is the brains behind the catchy riffs that have seen the three-piece rock outfit scoop multiple accolades since the current lineup was established in 2013, including winning a place on the Bestival main stage by beating off fierce, more experienced competition at an event at Northwood House.

As their status has grown, Sam’s own legacy has continued to flourish. Currently on a studio sabbatical to tour Europe, talk of a potential solo project has been rife around his native Cowes in his absence.

28. Carlie McGarity – Illustrator

Understated freelance graphic designer and illustrator who has romped onto the scene following a transition from retail worker to full-time artist.

In the year since that plunge towards uncharted territory, she has produced stunning images for the likes of Nakamarra, Chelsea Theatre and Duveaux amongst others.

Chalkpit Records subsequently snapped her up as an in-house designer, with her images splashed all over their website. Destined for even bigger and better things as her confidence continues to grow.

27. Doris Doolally – Creator

To pigeon hole Doris Doolally would be akin to clipping the wings of a unicorn. Her illustrations and creations have become a regular feature at BoomTown Fair since 2014.

Seemingly on a solo mission to bring the Dodo bird back into public consciousness, her spoken word performances are one of many other strings to her overloaded bow.

26. Dylan Kulmayer – rapper/music producer/video editor.

USA born, Isle of Wight raised Dylan Kulmayer released his debut rap EP, Retroverted Propulsion, via the platform of Soundcloud at the tender age of 18. Not content with that, the next phase of his development saw him produce his own beats and embellish his audio with punchy visuals, as rough edges continued to be levelled.

Currently at University, Dylan can usually be found on a film set or in the recording studio. The hugely aspirational 21 year-old workaholic has lofty sights set, with a much anticipated follow-up album in the works.

25. Laura Watt – TV Producer

Having studied for a career in production at Cheltenham University, Laura’s story is one of perseverance overcoming adversity, with a heavily populated and diluted marketplace resulting in ‘paying her dues’ as a runner.

Eventually she found her stride, selected to work on several reality TV series, most notably Big Brother, as well as a slew of other production pilots.

Ms Watt returned to the Isle as part of the Red Bull TV team that made a short documentary based around the 2016 Bestival.

24. Greg Barnes – Singer/Songwriter

South Coast Jack Johnson soundalike in flip-flops with a shock of red, ringed hair. Greg Barnes is at the forefront of the Ventnor music community, with his monthly events offering a platform for up and coming performers to hone their craft.

With an uninhibited  soulfulness beyond his years, most recent release Early Summer provided further evidence of a young musician with an ever expanding box of tools.

23. Buddy Carson – Spoken Word Artist/Musician.

Buddy Carson has been a trailblazer for the modern interpretation of spoken word on the Isle of Wight, a genre which has since spawned numerous local acts inspired by his emotionally charged delivery.

Now based in Bristol, a productive partnership with Emmy J Mac (of ‘The Voice’ fame) saw the duo become a fixture at events all over the UK, with the pair later focusing predominantly on mentoring youngsters keen to work in one of the creative industries.

22. Liam Burke – Singer/Songwriter

Liam Burke is a product of the Isle of Wight music college, Platform One, who has found himself touted for breakout stardom since he covered Stevie Wonders’ Fingertips aged just 14 at a Christmas show in New Orleans.

He specialises not in a specific genre, preferring instead to mesh dozens of them together to create something entirely original – often with instruments as far-fetched as rusty salad spoons, zeusaphones and stolen road signs.

21. Ivana Popov – Poet/Songwriter

Born in the Bahamas to French and English parents, Ivana somehow navigated a path to the Isle of Wight, before hitch-hiking across the globe by boat in order to escape again.

She didn’t stay away for long thankfully, and upon her return quickly became notorious for her amusing, offbeat poems and quirky ukulele ditties, including an album of animal related tracks that she occasionally dusts off at PETA meetings.

20. Lewis Shepperd – Musician

Lewis Shepperd is a musician from the isle of wight with a degree in commercial music. He has performed at various festivals and venues such as the Isle Of Wight Festival, Bestival, Camp Bestival and the NEC Arena in Birmingham.

He has been compared to Prince, not only for his lavish leopard skin robes and insistence on yellow M&M’s in his dressing room, but also a deeply intoxicating voice and elaborate range of self-penned tracks.

His debut single ‘Me’ has to date received 16,519 views on YouTube… 16,520 now that I’ve watched it. Despite this success he remains the same humble person that he was during his first job as a moonshiner in 2013.

19. Tina Edwards – TV Presenter

Tina Edwards fell into TV Presenting almost by accident. She had gone to London for a separate audition, when she was spotted and placed on a presenting course due to the huge potential those television executives present had seen in her.

Starting out with street interviews (some of those interviewed more articulate than others), she was able to hone her craft and become a producer for Balcony TV in London. Wouldn’t look out of place as the host of Channel Four’s Streetmate.

18. Isabelle L’Amour – Burlesque Performer/Model

Isabelle L’Amour, known to at least half a dozen people as the ‘South Coast Sweetheart’, is a UK based and award-winning international Burlesque & Cabaret performer, teacher and model.

Creator of The Blue Moon Revue, her show has had sell-out residency across the UK and hosted some of the biggest names in Burlesque, with Kitten de Ville, Natsumi Scarlett & Domino Barbeau all gracing her stage at various times.

17. Sarah Murphy – YouTube Fashion Vlogger

Sarah’s classic, old Hollywood beauty and style really shows through on her various social media platforms. She films everything from hauls to ‘look books’ for her viewers to enjoy.

The fashion vlogger, already boasting around 6,000 subscribers on her YouTube channel, is also known for benevolent acts of kindness, something borne out in her life philosophy: “I always try to make someone smile every day, it’s so important to be positive in life and to be kind to people”

16. Jazzy Heath – Musician/Music Producer

With the Summer release of new single ‘My Little Island‘ proving her most well received to date, Jazzy Heath shows no signs of reducing the relentless pace that has raised her profile as a musician around the UK.

Performing sporadically with her band, Pretty Censored, the 20 year-old and her entourage have come a long, long way together since the hard times and the good – the good being when she was part of the backing chorus for Fatboy Slim at the Bestival in 2011 (the gag’s a stretch I’ll admit.)

Also a talented beat maker, she has yet to decide which path to focus on post-studies.

15. Kes Eatwell – Recording Artist

Kestrel ‘Kes’ Eatwell is one of the most capricious artists to emerge from Isle of Wight music circles in recent years.

He turned down a set at Bestival in 2016 after winning a local spoken word competition, an incredibly bold act that paved the way for him to head to London in search of greater glory.

A proficient freestyler, Kes has wit and vocal dexterity in equal measure to ensure that it’s surely only a matter of time before he’s forged a successful career within the orbit of hip-hop.

14. Charlotte Tobitt – Journalist

Charlotte (far right) during her Yoppul days.

Charlotte Tobitt is something of a triple-threat creative force, graduating from Kingston University (In London, not Jamaica) with First Class Honours in journalism, having already secured a music qualification from the University of York, as well as becoming one of the UK’s premier cat whisperers in 2015.

Working her way up the ranks of the Surrey Advertiser via the Isle of Wight County Press’s youth offshoot, Yoppul, Charlotte secured the MA journalist of the year gong at Kingston in late 2014.

13. Jack Whitewood – Entrepreneur

The brains behind the Ventnor Fringe Festival, Jack has been a regular champion for the Isle of Wight arts, hosting and funding an abundance of productions from his HQ at Ventnor Exchange.

The festival itself has evolved from humble beginnings in 2010 to a week long explosion of luminosity, sound and general quirkiness that envelops the entirety of the seaside town, temporarily transforming it into a postcard of the French Riviera.

12. Olly Fry – Actor/Playwright

Olly Fry is ostensibly a man who never sleeps – not far beyond his juvenescence, he has written, directed and starred in more than 40 plays already, and could conceivably follow in the thespian footsteps of fellow Isle of Wighter, Jeremy Irons.

His critically acclaimed one man show, I Hooky, an undercard highlight of the 2017 Isle of Wight Festival, served as a brutally candid, anarchic glimpse into the past tribulations of an actor sufficiently bold to blend bleak with blissful.

11. Charlie Jones – Singer/Songwriter

Raised on the Isle of Wight under the guidance of a high profile musician father, Charlie Jones was classically trained but discovered a love of electo whilst studying law in France.

Part of indie-electo quintet, Nakamarra, (a band named after this song by Hiatus Kaiyote) she’s blessed with a full vocal range, and her performances are theatrically expressive. Temptress, the band’s latest single, is an ode to innocence and expectation.

10. Alex Vanblaere – Music Man/Fashionista

Eccentric, wackily maned bassist who is the heartbeat of math-pop starlets Signals. Alex expertly tip-toes along the line between hipster and flower child, without ever coming across as contrived or overly rehearsed.

To fixate on this personality and musk would be to underestimate the prowess of his playing, which has seen him compared to legendary funkster Bootsy Collins.

9. Nye Russell-Thompson – Actor/Playwright

An engaging and charming personality who has performed his shows all across the UK, receiving a nomination for a Filmflare Award for his hugely popular Stammermouth show.

This spirited one man presentation focuses on the difficulty of suffering with a stammer by utilising a brew of dark humour, hopelessness and a concise storyline arch – all exquisitely showcased without ever threatening to cross into melancholy.

8. Annabelle Spencer – Musician

Annabelle Spencer is 17 years old; she plays 7 instruments, writes her own music, teaches and has a voice that sends chills down the stiffest spine… I’m not jealous, I’m honestly not – those are tears of joy.

In addition to a range of her own material (including recent release Feather on the Tide), she covers all genres from bubble gum pop to rock depending on the mood, all of this whilst still studying at Platform One and maintaining follicles that would make Macy Gray envious.

7. Rhain – Musician

The artist formerly known as Babooshka Baba Yaga has come a long way since her initial live piano recitals which began to spread her name along the south coast, thereafter finding her calling as an operatic solo artist and integral member of the Plastic Mermaids.

It is with the latter that she broached the local mainstream, with their rousing Magnum Opus, Beyond the Cosmos After Death, a track which provides an ideal vehicle for Rhain’s extensive vocal dexterity.

6. Sepia – DJ

Sepia, or Theo Bennett to those who know him best, carved his reputation as a blockbusting DJ in Brighton, Bristol and… Brading (as well as other places not starting with ‘br’) and has enjoyed extensive  airplay on Radio One.

Sharing a stage with names as high in profile as James Blake and Joy Orbison, Sepia’s output generally has an uncomplicated veneer, with smooth transitions accompanying beats full of vitality.

5. Lauran Hibberd – Singer/Songwriter

With the afore mentioned Red Bull TV Bestival documentary (see no.25: Laura Watt) issuing a sub-section dedicated to her, Lauran Hibberd’s momentum threatens to elevate her to juggernaut status among fellow poppy-folk music makers.

After recently supporting Clean Cut Kid, and fresh from the Bestival main stage Lauran’s ever-growing Industrial Folk sound hints at a grander live vision, captured eloquently in her recordings to date.

4. Louis Checkley – Jazz singer

An award winning vocalist from Wroxall, Louis has carved out a niche for himself within the Brighton jazz scene with his often witty and elegantly wrought tunes infused by a piquant flavour of soul.

Though steering clear of vocal gymnastics, Louis’s ample range is light in tone, conversational in its approach and, with an effortlessly dulcet lilt, stands out from the crowd enough to earn its place among premier contemporary jazz singers, aptly demonstrated by his reaching the summit of the Balcony TV Worldwide charts in 2014.

3. Dayita – Innovator

A non-conforming human glitter ball who can’t be pigeon-holed by genre, Dayita materialised on festival stages around the Isle of Wight in the summer of 2017, providing a vivid audio/visual experience that invigorated a principally pop-rock landscape.

Her recent single release, Six Seconds, was an explosion of silver glitter, seductive articulation and Pinnochio-falling-down-the-stairs backing beats apt both for nighttime club use and daytime radio play.  Wonderfully kooky.

2. Adam Pacciti – Film Maker/ Online Personality

A master of the viral video, Adam Pacciti first surfaced on a national stage when releasing his Girl of My Dreams video, where he claimed to have been rescued from the zombie apocalypse by a dazzling dame paddling around his pineal, subsequently scrawling a (deliberately indistinguishable) sketch of her and urging viewers to assist in the search.

The publicity of more than half a million views across social media saw Adam featured on a glut of national television programmes, notably ITV News and GMTV.

A second viral endeavour, via a billboard in London pleading for a job, aligned with his increasing clout as a presenter of Whatculture, blazed the spotlight more brightly upon him, before his recent departure from the group led to speculation that he’s set to open his own wrestling company. Watch this space.

1. Sarah Close – YouTuber/Musician

A product of Ryde School’s music choir during her childhood, Sarah Close began posting covers of songs onto YouTube in the late noughties, aged just 14.  Four years later she relocated to London to attend The Institute of Contemporary Music Performance, where she studied music and songwriting.

Sarah released her debut single ‘Call Me Out’ in March of this year, which charted at number one on the UK Official Physical Singles Chart, the first Isle of Wight solo artist to achieve the feat. 

Releasing follow-up, Only You last month, her YouTube channel is swiftly hurtling towards a whopping 800,000 subscribers.

Think we missed anyone out of the list? Leave a message in the comment section below and please throw Kureen a like on Facebook!

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Bestival 2014: 10 local acts that you won’t want to miss!

The UK’s summer festival season comes hurtling towards its conclusion next weekend, with the Bestival taking place at Robin Hill Park on the Isle of Wight.

While the likes of Outkast, Beck and Busta Rhymes have justifiably dominated much of the build up to the event, there are also a host of local acts set for action, Dom Kureen takes a looks at ten of the best (including two adopted ‘Caulkheads.’)

 

1. Claydon Connor (Bandstand: Friday, 10am)

Yes, I know – 10am on Friday at the Bestival is usually when the previous night’s revellers are contemplating hitting the hay for their daily power nap, or latecomers are lugging tents and booze towards their desired patch of turf, but Claydon Connor is a singer/guitarist well worth rousing yourself to witness.

An erstwhile scholar at the Isle of Wight’s Platform One music college, the 26 year old’s debut album, ‘Feels Like Home,’ released in 2009, provided a glimpse of the predominantly acoustic indie-rock musings of a raw artist who didn’t sound entirely comfortable with the genre.

A welcome evolution towards country/Americana rock is evident in Connor’s summer 2014 LP, ‘Under The Big Sky,’ where subtle, captivating instrumental strains accompany increasingly confident and sentimentality dripping vocals – a fact borne out by some rousing, evocative recent live performances, including a memorable Kashmir Cafe set at this year’s Isle of Wight Festival.

 

2. Buddy Carson (Bandstand: Saturday, 12pm)

When it comes to spoken word (or poetry to give it the ‘non-kid friendly’ moniker), Bestival regulars Kate Tempest and Scroobius Pip are indisputably once again the marquee names on the bill.

There are some real hidden gems amongst the other performers though, with Buddy Carson a must-see for anyone who enjoys intoxication by rhythmic rhetoric.

Hailing from these shores, the talented wordsmith’s work with Flip The Script and Stand Up For Lyricism has not only allowed a myriad of youngsters to benefit from his wisdom, but also brought his regularly anecdotal based introspections to a fresh audience. Even more annoyingly he’s a bloody marvellous singer, nifty with a Cajón drum and regularly donates money to charity without tipping buckets of ice water over himself!

 

3.  Plastic Mermaids (Matua Stage: Friday 2pm & Bandstand: Friday 8pm)

Mermaids have given this writer a lot to be grateful for: A 1984 film where Tom Hanks gets jiggy with a fish, a cartoon to put on when my niece is getting out of hand and of course that movie simply entitled ‘Mermaids’ with a Cher soundtrack that traumatised my childhood in the early 90’s during what seemed like a 400 week run at the summit of the charts.

Recently I discovered one more delight; this time in the shape of wonderfully experimental 5-piece Plastic Mermaids, now in their fifth year as a collective. Oozing eccentricity, the band’s increasing profile has ensured regular sell-out gigs around the UK and an expanding appreciation from other sections of the industry, with their tracks providing the backdrop for a slew of campaigns and websites.

Dropping début EP, Drømtorp, earlier this month (think early Syd Barrett meets Röyksopp), the quintet were apparently directly earmarked by Bestival top brass as a must-have psychedelic component of the festivities. They play twice, so there’s no reason to miss out.

 

4. Ba.Dow (Main Stage: Friday, 12pm)

Ba.Dow delivered the goods under intense pressure to deservedly win the Bestival battle of the bands competition earlier this year, having seen off pre-comp favourites Pleasurade and Duveaux.

Starting life as a four-piece, the departure of original front-woman Charlie Jones meant that drummer Jodie Amos was thrust into a dual role, a move that proved a catalyst in accelerating the remaining trio’s development, her spine tingling diction exquisitely supplementing the frequently catchy guitar riffs of Sam Morris and Bradley McGinty.

Expect them to emulate last year’s band competition winners Signals and deliver a stellar half-hour set, gaining a multitude of new devotees in the process – Ba.Dow will be in their element on the main stage.

 

5. Wille and The Bandits (Bandstand: Saturday, 1pm)

For many attendees the highlight of the 2014 Rhythmtree hippy free-for-all was provided by the high-octane, unpredictable performance of soulful trio Wille and The Bandits, a group consisting almost entirely of big hair and ear popping instrumental sequences.

A 2011 Daily Telegraph write-up describing them as one of the most exciting unsigned acts in the country has been followed by a range of other ringing endorsements from the likes of BBC Radio One and The Independent newspaper earlier this year.

It’s clear that Wille and his bandits have been placed on a pedestal by a clutch of illustrious media outlets – hype vindicated every time they set foot on stage. Despite not being natives, the Isle of Wight has become the guys’ home away from home, as well as a location that accounts for a decent chunk of their rapidly expanding fanbase.

 

6. Fine Lines (Bandstand: Thursday, 4.30pm)

Fine Lines are an Isle of Wight folk/alternative rock sextet who are something of a local super group, with the majority of members having resided on lofty solo perches before combining forces to create a musical equivalent of The Avengers.

The three singers’ voices mesh well and those who witnessed them at Chorderize in 2013 were unanimous in their praise of the eclectic talents on show, there’s no chance of the ensemble becoming typecast with the likes of Floella Grace, Hester Chambers and Gareth Ashworth each bringing wide ranging interpretations to irksomely catchy compositions.

Half of the band can sing and half can play the guitar – but which halves? Only those who dare to visit the Bestival site as early as 4.30pm on Thursday will ever know.

 

7. Too Many T’s (Main stage: Friday, 2pm)

Hip-hop like it used to be, Too Many T’s, aka Ross Standaloft and Leon Rhymes, mix shtick with the occasional bout of seriously deep retrospection, atop a series of catchy backing tracks courtesy of DJ Savage Henry.

Since forming in 2011, the pair have built a reputation as one of the most authentic old-school rap acts on the British circuit, winning critical acclaim from a host of highly respected authorities on the genre, including the Bestival’s own curator Rob Da Bank.

Performing on the main stage, expect a blitz of lyrics and beats that’ll have even the grouchiest toddler head banging from their push chair. Essential listening for hip-hop fans.

 

8. Duveaux (Random open mics)

There’s more than a hint of The Divine Comedy about the way Dan Duveaux theatrically fronts the band that carries his surname, although that’s where the similarities end.

A nattily attired five-piece, the indie-rockers performed more than half a dozen times during this year’s Isle of Wight Festival and have remained impressively active throughout the summer, never afraid to experiment with a pleasingly reliable stream of new material.

Simultaneous with that unrelenting work ethic has been an inevitable increase in stage presence and while it may be the front man whose name is on the posters, there’s no doubt that it is the collaborative talent on show that makes Duveaux such a must-see band.

 

9. The Ohmz (Roots Reggae Stage: Thursday, 6pm & Bandstand: Saturday, 2pm)

In their own words: The Ohmz formed when five goats from a farm wandered into a reggae and tea night at the local, discovered they shared a love of tea (and reggae) and decided to write some songs about that.

Mutual adoration of tea aside, this reggae five-some might be the closest thing that the Isle of Wight has to Bob Marley and the Proclaimers, despite local crooner Derek Sandy’s claims to the contrary.

Booked to fill afternoon and early evening slots, The Ohmz will undoubtedly create a couple of the grooviest, most laid back atmospheres of the entire weekend.

 

10. Signals (Bandstand: Saturday, 1pm)

Signals are a math-pop, female-fronted four-piece from the Isle of Wight… That’s what all the press releases say.

What the hell is math-pop you ask? Although it sounds like something akin to Carol Vorderman giving live birth on Countdown, it’s actually a genre of music – that’s right, another genre – f**k, I’d only just learned the old ones.

Genres aside, Signals are an explosive, exciting band with a brilliant lead singer in Ellie Price and one of the finest bass guitarists that the Isle of Wight has ever produced in the shape of Alex Vanblaere (he’s the one rocking the hipster look.) They were the first Platform One band that really seemed to blaze a trail beyond the safety of their island and today provide a benchmark for the rest to strive for.

Like the list? Think someone’s missing? Let us know in the comment section below and please like our Facebook page! Most importantly, please support all of the bands mentioned and go and see them if you find time.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Max Lyrical at Ventnor Fringe

On Friday, 15th August, a collaboration of the finest talent from the Isle of Wight and beyond make their way to the south coast’s answer to Edinburgh’s esteemed Fringe Festival for the deliciously titled Max Lyrical.

Based in the seaside town of the same name, the Ventnor Fringe Festival has expanded substantially since its inception in 2010, with the woodland area (which hosts the show), a hauntingly captivating backdrop for the spoken word and music that will be on offer.

Here’s the low down on some of the acts that will be performing at Max Lyrical.


DJ Nipsy

– Plays throughout the night –

DJ Nipsy

“He’s unlike any other DJ I’ve heard” Sam Cox, a member of Putney’s RMS recording studios told me upon first stumbling upon ‘Nipsy’ during a fluke encounter after the 2013 Isle of Wight Festival.

After a short sabbatical, he returns at Max Lyrical, expect amazing beats throughout from the king of the deck-dub-math-pop-step genre!


Dylan Kulmayer

– Spoken Word/Rap: 20.10-20.30

Dylan Kulmayer

When I was 17 years of age my mindset frequently switched between subjects as taxing as how many spots I had and how harsh life was as I quaffed apathetically on Perrier water and smoked salmon.

At the same age, Dylan Kulmayer, aka DRK, has recently released his debut EP and, perhaps more tellingly, refuses to go near Perrier, content to slum it with Evian. His lyrics are also wise far beyond his years and his EP received the thumbs up from Kureen.co.uk


DxK

-Spoken Word: 20.30-20.45

Maxx Lyrical

If DxK following DRK isn’t confusing enough, this gem also goes by a slightly different version of the gig name, Maxx Lyrical, on special occasions (Bar mitzvahs, weddings etc.)

Infeasibly handsome and with an IQ of 239, the young stud from parts unknown would be Russell Brand’s meditation partner if ever the two crossed paths.


Ba.Dow

– Music: 20.45-21.10

Ba.Dow

Like a scene from the original Batman, Ba.Dow’s name crashes through the air each time it leaves somebody’s lips, rendering any surrounding pigeons temporarily incapacitated.

Having won the 2014 Bestival competition, this is the start of an exciting journey for a rich sounding band with virtually unlimited upside.


Unannounced act

– Rap/Spoken word 21.30-21.45

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‘Unannounced act’ often refers to a deep panic behind the scenes, as every prospective wordsmith or person owning a beret is urged to spout some words in front of an audience for a few minutes.

That’s far from the case here – Indeed, the organisers have booked… Um… Dave, no wait, DJ Petrolhead. Well, there is someone booked and he/she is bloody marvellous, even the Isle of Wight Country Pamphlet and Joppul Junior site would be impressed!

 

Donna Jones MBE

– Spoken Word: 21.45-22.00

 

Of all the MBE’s I’ve known Donna Jones is the finest. Her gritty, honest, colourful poetry should provide the ideal contrast to some of the potty mouthed shenanigans elsewhere.

A published poet, Donna offers a welcome change of tempo to the gig and brings decades of decadent rhetoric to the table.


Buddy Carson and Emmy J Mac

– Spoken Word/Music: 22.00-22.30

Buddy and Emmy
You can’t have a spoken word event without Buddy and Emmy. Well, you can, but it wouldn’t be anywhere near as good.

The headliners are the perfect blend of silky lyricism and ear trembling melodies. Anyone who hasn’t heard Emmy J Mac live and in living colour is in for a treat, her voice is one of the finest to emanate from these shores.

The gig promises to be a special one, get your buttocks over. At £8 for two tickets (2-4-1 deal with Ventnor Fringe) it’s an absolute bargain.

Do you know what else costs £8? Carrot Top’s new DVD – Carrot Top! So, if you don’t come along then you’re basically supporting the flame haired twerp by default.

To purchase tickets for the show either phone Ventnor Fringe on 0843 289 8718 or book via their website.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.