Tag Archives: Chris

Interviews with Creative Minds. No.21: Chris Brennan

21 today! This 21st edition of the Creative Minds podcast series features an interview with Chris Brennan, plus music from Unravellings and Pretty Censored (and a short excerpt of a rap what I done!)

The Links

–> Custom website <–

–> Unravellings on SoundCloud <–

–> Pretty Censored YouTube interview <–

–> Gary Yourofsky talk <–

–> Cowspiracy trailer <–

–> Forks Over Knives trailer <–

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Top 10 British boxers of all time (Part Two)

In the first part of Ken Irons’ article he revealed the first half of his top ten British boxers of all time, this time we find out who made the top five (and more importantly the number one slot!)  So who did our man at ringside feel were the premier pugilists from the land of the Rose? Read on and find out…

5) Chris Eubank 

Middle & Super Middleweight (45-5-2, 23 KO’s)

London born Eubank moved, in his teens, to New York, where he eventually fought off drug, alcohol and shop lifting dependencies when he took up boxing. 

On his return to the U.K. he was undefeated world middleweight champion for over five years and unbeaten in all fights in his first ten years as a pro.

His lisping drawl, eccentric attire and foppish attitude antagonised some (including arch adversary Nigel Benn) but masked a steely character.

 4) Carl Froch

Super Middleweight (33-2, 24 KO’s)

Froch, from Nottingham, is generally regarded as the best pound for pound British fighter currently plying his trade.

Nicknamed ‘The Cobra’, the 38 year-old has won 33 of his fights (24 knock outs) and suffered his only defeats by decision, with a record of 9–2 in world title fights, four victories being by knock out.

 –

3) John Conteh           

Light Heavyweight (34-4-1, 23 KO’s)

Aged only 19 Lancastrian Conteh won a gold medal at middleweight in the 1970 Olympics.

On turning professional he won the WBC light heavyweight crown in 1974 and held it until 1977. He retired in 1980 with a record of 34 wins, 4 losses and a solitary draw.

Regrettably he was another superbly talented fighter who could have done better still had it not been for an alleged penchant for the high life.

 –

2) Joe Calzaghe CBE

Super Middleweight (46-0, 32 KO’s)

British Lionhearts v Italia Thunder - World Series of Boxing

Welsh southpaw Calzaghe held WBO, WBA WBC & IBF super middle titles and is the longest reigning super middle champion in history, retiring undefeated in 2009.

His popularity has since resulted in appearances on national TV shows, while a perfect professional record of 46-0 is one of the finest in the history of elite level sparring, trumped only by Rocky Marciano (49-0) and Floyd Mayweather Jr (47-0).      

– 

1) Lennox Lewis CM, CBE

Heavyweight (41-2-1, 32 KO’s)

Born in West Ham, Lewis moved to Canada in childhood but retains dual nationality. At 6 feet 5 inches and around 17 stone, easy going, chess playing Lewis was a supreme boxer with a knock out punch in either hand.

He held the undisputed world title and never ducked a fight in an era (nineties) when there were plenty of dangerous fighters around, such as Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield and Vitali Klitschko (all of whom Lewis subjugated.)

His only professional defeats were duly and emphatically avenged in resultant re-matches.

What do you think of Ken’s choices? Should Ricky Hatton have made the cut? How about Frank Bruno or Herbie Hyde (ok, the last one might be a joke!)

Written by Ken Irons

I have always had a love of the written word and have frequently, over the years, exasperated editors, publishers et al with my copious submissions of work. My highly advanced years I find a plus, as it means not having to research so much - I can remember it if it's in the last century or so!

Sound Bite: Undecided Arts Collective

DxK is joined by Mark Dickson who discusses being part of a collective.

To take a peek at the Undecided Arts Collective Facebook page click —> HERE

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

50 Greatest British sports stars of all-time: 20-11

In this penultimate instalment of the series, Kureen gracefully glides towards the upper echelon of the British sporting elite.

To view the first three parts click on the links below;
50-4140-3130-21

20: Sir Walter HammondWalter Hammond

A world-class batsman, inspirational captain, brilliant fielder and tidy, albeit reluctant, medium paced bowler, Hammond appeared in 85 Test matches, compiling an at the time Test record individual score of 336 not out, despite losing years of his career to the second World War.

In addition to his cricketing prowess, Hammond made a handful of appearance as right winger for Bristol Rovers, but in spite of his obvious footballing talent only had eyes for cricket. A glittering 20 year international career finally ended at the age of 43, although a rivalry with the legendary Sir Donald Bradman bred a life-long inferiority complex.

19: Tony McCoy

The 2010 BBC sports personality of the year has won 19 consecutive Champion Jockey titles, and more than 4,300 races all told.

Particularly adept at riding poor horses to unlikely victories, McCoy continues to excel into his 40’s, showing no sign of retiring from the saddle any time soon.  At 5’10” he also stands considerably taller than most jockeys, making his success all the more improbable.

18: Johnny Wilkinson

Kicking the winning drop goal for England at the 2003 Rugby World Cup made Surrey born Wilkinson an instant national icon at the tender age of 23.

Injuries blighted his career throughout, but he still managed to play 91 Tests and score a record 1,169 points for his country. He represented Newcastle Falcons with distinction for 12 years, before a 5-year spell in France with Toulon culminated with Wilkinson leading his team to two cup final wins in his final brace of competitive appearances.

17: Jim LakerJim Laker

Laker’s long-standing first-class bowling record analysis of 19 for 90, achieved against Australia in 1956, is unlikely to be bettered, and amazingly came just weeks after the spin bowler had taken all ten wickets in an innings against the touring Australians in a  warm up match against his county side Surrey.

A Yorkshireman, Laker never actually represented his native county due to settling in London following World War II, instead forming a deadly spin-combo with Tony Lock for both club and country. His record of 193 Test scalps at 21.57 apiece places him firmly among the great tweakers.

16: Dame Kelly Holmes

Inspired by Steve Ovett, Holmes began her competitive athletics career at the age of just 12, winning the British girl’s 1500m the following year. By 1988 she had turned her back on the sport to join the army, only returning to the track four years later.

A succession of debilitating injuries appeared to have denied Holmes gold medals at the major games, until in 2004, at the grand age of 34, she produced nerveless, perfectly paced runs to take gold in both the 800 and 1500 metre races. Holmes later admitted that she had contemplated suicide during the darker days, citing meditation as a practice that transformed her life.

15: Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean

Few sports people have ever come close to emulating the popularity of Torvill and Dean, who came to national prominence when they scored 12 perfect 6’s on their way to Olympic figure skating gold in Sarajevo in 1984.

Turning professional later that year (rules prohibited them from earning any money from skating if they wanted to perform at the Olympics), the duo choreographed a series of successful musical shows on ice, before returning to the pro arena a decade later to take bronze in Lillehammer.

14: Sir Christopher Hoy

The most decorated cyclist of all-time is an 11-time World champion, six-time Olympic champion, and Britain’s most successful Olympian, leading team GB out for the 2012 Olympic opening ceremony.

A legendary sprint cyclist, Hoy’s individual success carried over into team cycling, where he represented various teams, most notably ‘Team Sky’ in 2008. Never one to rest on his laurels, the Edinburgh born 39 year-old turned his attention to motor sport in 2014, belatedly announcing his intention to compete for Nissan at 24 hours of Le Mans in 2016.

13: Sir Bobby Charlton

The creative catalyst for England’s 1966 World Cup glory remains one of the world’s most beloved sporting figures almost half a century after his career zenith.

The 1958 Munich air disaster deprived Manchester United of a slew of their exciting ‘Busby Babes’ squad, with Charlton himself considering retiring from the game due to the trauma. Thankfully for United and England he didn’t, going on to become one of the finest number tens the world has ever seen, with the Ballon d’Or awarded to him at the end of the same year that he held the Jules Rimet trophy aloft.

12: Daley Thompson

At a time when the original A-Team was in its prime Britain boasted its own action man in Daley Thompson, a muscle-bound decathlon competitor who struck gold at both the 1980 and 1984 Olympic games, breaking the world record for the event on four separate occasions.

That his feats often go overlooked in the nation’s sporting annals is possibly testament to a lack of perceived conformity, most notably when Thompson whistled his way through the national anthem whilst stood atop the podium in Los Angeles in ’84.  

11: Sir Ben Ainslie

The most successful Olympic sailor of all-time, Ainslie won silver at his first games in 1996, aged just 19, this would be his last time tasting defeat on the grandest stage, with gold following at the next five Olympics to go alongside his 11 World titles.

Sir Ben Ainslie

More recently Ainslie was hailed as the mastermind behind Oracle Team USA’s stunning comeback to win the 2013 America’s Cup 9-8, the Brit providing an unlikely remedy to the team’s warring crew and hefty fines as they turned around a seemingly insurmountable 8-1 deficit.

Tomorrow we delve into the top 10. Who made it? Who missed out? Why the need for so many questions in the closing paragraph? All will be revealed tomorrow.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Gayle Force W.Indies

West Indian opening batsman Chris Gayle spanked Zimbabwe’s bowlers all over the Manuka Oval in Canberra on Tuesday afternoon, blazing a trail towards a record obliterating score of 215 at the cricket World Cup.

The previously out of form 35 year-old  already held the individual record score for Twenty20 cricket, rattling along to 175 not out for Royal Challengers Bangalore against Pune Warriors India during the 2013 IPL season.

Chris Gayle

A breakdown of Gayle’s record breaking innings

215
The highest individual score ever in a World Cup, beating Gary Kirsten’s previous mark of 188 not out for South Africa against United Arab Emirates in 1996.

138
The number of deliveries it took Gayle to reach his double hundred, the fastest ever 200 in One Day International cricket.

16
ODI record-equalling number of sixes scored by the West Indian in his innings, a total previously achieved by India’s Rohit Sharma and South Africa’s AB de Villiers.

1st
Gayle is the first non-Indian player to score a double ton in ODI cricket, and this was the first score of 200+ made outside of the sub-continent.

372
Gayle’s partnership of 372 with Marlon Samuels is the highest of all-time, easily surpassing the previous record stand of 331 set by Sachin Tendulkar and Rahul Dravid for India against New Zealand.

**************************************************************************

Gayle’s innings ended when he was dismissed from the final delivery of the West Indies’ innings going for one final, record breaking maximum. His 215 is the third highest ODI score of all time, still falling well shy of Rohit Sharma’s knock of 264 for India against Sri Lanka in November last year.

The West Indies will believe that, despite possessing a mediocre squad, they have an outside chance of capturing the trophy if their main man can continue his destructive form. Even if he can, he’ll be hard pushed to match an incredible innings from a big match player who once again lit up the big stage.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Album Review: Coldplay – Ghost Stories

Coldplay’s ‘Ghost Stories’ went straight to the summit of the UK album charts, Dom Kureen shares his opinion of the latest offering from Parlophone’s premier cash cow.

Coldplay 2

 

“I think of you, I haven’t slept. I think I do, but I don’t forget.”

From the offset it’s clear that the motivating energy source for Coldplay’s chart-topping album, ‘Ghost Stories’ lies squarely at the manicured hands of Chris Martin’s erstwhile spouse Gwyneth Paltrow.

Unashamedly melancholic, there is a raw honesty rarely glimpsed in the band’s work since they broke the proverbial glass ceiling with ‘Parachutes’ in 2000.

Few traces of the Japanese rave-pop that dominated previous LP, ‘Mylo Xyloto,’ remain, something that should appease die-hard fans who felt the band had strayed too far from what brought them to the dance.

There is certainly some worthwhile material here, first single release ‘Magic’ instantly hooks the listener with its basic percussion and uncorrupted ivory tinkling.

That gratifying simplicity is also present in opening gambit ‘Always in My Head’ and gradual grower ‘Oceans,’ both of which are painfully candid at times and expose the psychological fragility with which they were penned and recorded.

From there things drift a touch, although the thudding piano of ‘A Sky Full of Stars’ dovetails exquisitely with the reluctant interlude that supplants it.

Chris Martin: Ms Paltrow wouldn't let him eat anything yellow.
Chris Martin: Ms Paltrow wouldn’t let him eat anything yellow.

An album that ambles along provides ample ammunition for Coldplay’s detractors, who claim that their music lacks flexibility, relying too freely on gushing sentiment – on this evidence they may have a point.

A pleasant release, ‘Ghost Stories’ is unlikely to rock anyone’s world, but perhaps that was never the intention. This is a transparent extension of deep wounds gradually healing, with irregular pinches of welcome joviality to some extent compensating for the pre-eminent air of mourning.

Fittingly it resolves with the line “Don’t ever let go,” by which we can assume that the singer hasn’t completely given up on an unlikely romantic reconciliation – it is perhaps that prospect that prevents Coldplay from fully exerting the throttle, instead producing an album with whispers of sublime beauty, but frustrating repetition.

 

A sweet eulogy to lost love, ‘Ghost Stories’ promises more than it ultimately delivers.
 

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.