Tag Archives: Going

20 Best TV Spin-Offs Ever: Pt.1 (20th-11th)

With last year’s UK première of Breaking Bad spin-off, Better Call Saul, receiving huge plaudits, Kureen thought the time was apt to share our 20 best and worst spin-offs to reach the small screen not including Saul’s antics. In part one Dom Kureen reveals positions 20 to 11. 

Stephen Colbert

*Years of broadcast and original series in parenthesis.

20. Muppet Babies (1984-91, The Muppets)

The 1980’s was a decade chock-full of cartoons with good intentions. The Muppet Babies revolved around the power of imagination, and gave kids (and possibly morally stunted adults) some ethical food for thought meshed with just enough entertainment to avoid being preachy.

19. Kenan and Kel (1996-2000, All That)

“Who loves orange soda…”
With catchphrases like the above, Kenan Thompson and Kel Mitchell were destined to captivate audiences from the get-go. What on paper looked naff was performed with gusto by the duo, providing the pinnacle of late 1990’s teenage satire during their pomp – With early 21st Century internet rumours of Kenan’s demise proving premature.

18. Going Straight (1978, Porridge)

Going Straight followed former jailbird Norman Stanley Fletcher as he attempted to adapt to life on the ‘outside’. Despite relying excessively on a so-so support cast, and not coming close to emulating its predecessor Porridge, Ronnie Barker was able to provide fitting closure for fans of the protagonist, while sporadically dropping memorable one-liners along the way.

17. Torchwood (2006-10, Doctor Who)

A year after Russell T Davies revived Doctor Who, he created this spin-off for the character ‘Captain Jack Harkness’ (John Barrowman), an immortal time-travelling former con man. A distinctively Welsh twist on the original saw Captain Jack heading up the Cardiff branch of the Torchwood institute, which deals with incidents involving aliens… And the title is an anagram of ‘Doctor Who’, those smarty clever bastards!

16. Xena Warrior Princess (1995-2001, Hercules: The Legendary Journeys)

Coming at a time when ‘girl power’ was in full force, Xena started life on the dark side, before eventually realising the error of her ways and turning face. With a strong, independent and alluring swagger, the series made up for some woeful scripts with enough action, titillation and engaging plot arcs to maintain it during a six-year run.

15. Angel (1999-2004, Buffy the Vampire Slayer)

The show about a guilt-ridden vampire with a human soul ran for five seasons and was a successful spin-off of Joss Whedon’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer. David Boreanaz’s Angel and Sarah Michelle Gellar’s Buffy seemed to be stake-cross’d lovers, until Angel left to start his own series at the end of season three.

14. Mork and Mindy (1978-82, Happy Days)

This popular sitcom was borne out of a dream had by Happy Days’ Richie Cunningham in which alien Mork (played by an unknown Robin Williams) tried to take Richie back to his home planet of Ork. Series producer Garry Marshall was so impressed by Williams’s comic ability that he gave him his own series about an alien who comes to Earth to study human behaviour and moves in with a woman he meets.

13. The Colbert Report (2005-14, The Daily Show)

Political satirist Stephen Tyrone Colbert took on cable-news pundits in this show’s decade long run, which centred around his essential rightness about the issues of the day. Colbert portrayed a caricature of the conservative political pundits often seen on channels such as Fox News. In addition, the show was known for coming up with new words that enter the lexicon, most notably “truthiness.”

12. Summer Heights High (2007, We Can Be Heroes)

Chris Lilley nailed it with this ‘mockumentary’ based within the confines of the fictional Summer Heights high-school based in Sydney. The Australian comedian expertly portrayed all three of the main characters, allowing viewers an occasional window for empathy during the show’s otherwise relentless hilarity. 

11. Daria (1997-2001,  Beavis and Butthead)

Under rated cartoon following acutely perceptive, acerbic tongued teenager Daria Morgendorffer. Her self-esteem teacher can’t even remember her name, not that low self-esteem is a problem for Daria, who in one memorable exchange with her family explains that “I don’t have low self-esteem, it’s a mistake… I have low esteem for everyone else.”

Tune in again tomorrow for our top 10 spin-offs of all time, let us know what you think deserves the number one spot, and if you’re feeling kind please like and share the Kureen Facebook page x

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

101 Great Albums. No.6: Marvin Gaye – What’s Going On

In 1971 Marvin Gaye sought to defy the pop blueprint that had come to identify the Motown label, instead delivering a profound, contentious chronicle of the political and social disparity present in America at the time.

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Motown founder, Berry Gordy, unfortunately did not share Gaye’s vision for revision, dismissing title track “What’s Going On?” as the ‘worst song he had ever heard’ and imploring his potentially pioneering artist to return to honey-bloated, tried and trusted methods.

Marvin indignantly rebuffed such a proposal, asserting that if the track wasn’t released as a single then he would never record for Gordy again, while privately confiding in family and friends that he felt stung by his mentor’s reaction.

Marvin Gaye

Following extensive negotiation, Motown acquiesced and the album’s title track was released, subsequently reaching the US billboard’s top five and acting as catalyst to an era of LP’s strung together by socially pertinent narrative.

To dismiss “What’s Going On” as a one track album would be frivolous of course. The inaugural glut of half a dozen songs are blended together with evident precision, and although a first listen may provoke criticism towards sentimental sameness within the first half of the album, it is soon discernible that this deliberately dovetails with closing cuts.

“Inner City Blues (makes me wanna holla)” arguably showcases the pinnacle of proceedings, with its timely mesh of multi-tracked vocals and gritty lyrics creating an affecting springboard that never threatens to outstay its welcome.

Others of note are the pleading “Mercy, Mercy Me (The ecology)” and effortlessly uplifting “God is Love”, the latter of which delivers optimism in spades, albeit from a religious standpoint.

At the eleventh attempt, Marvin Gaye produced a studio album that broke him out as a legitimate and conscientious solo-superstar.

In the embryonic stages of what was to become Cocaine dependency (and rarely sans-doobie in the studio) Marvin produced and recorded an album which set his career on a fresh (ultimately tragic) course – that’s a story for another time though.

“What’s Going On” topped the R&B charts in America in 1971 and is justifiably regarded as a trailblazing album of its time, as well as being integral to Motown’s shift of gears throughout a fertile decade.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.