Tag Archives: Rap

101 Great Albums. No.9: Kendrick Lamar – Section.80

Section.80 is an often overlooked part of Kendrick Lamar’s impressive back catalogue, coming as it did just a year before the critically acclaimed Good Kid M.A.A.D City, but offered the first (inconsistent) sample of the rapper’s desired direction.

Lamar focuses the majority of 16 breezy “chapters” upon specific life events, refusing to accommodate generalisation, and thus conjuring lustrous couplets that knit tightly between exquisitely arranged soundtracks.

Chapter Six refers to the unpretentious pleasure of cruising around in a car whilst clouds of Mary Jane pour freely through ones lips (the most middle-classed description for blazin’ up I could muster).

Kendrick Lamar

With a blissfully soulful beat and repetitious lyrics, the song jabs hypnotically at the listener’s senses, breaking from archetypal flow with its linear structure, whilst also containing the requisite chitty-chatty bridge associated with contemporary rap releases.

Admittedly the first three songs on the album, the delectably titled F**k Your Ethnicity, Hol’ Up and A.D.H.D, are the sparkling apex of the piece, and to have continued in the same vain would have guaranteed further accolades upon release.

This is a bit of shame, as the rest of the album has plenty to offer, and had tracks been dispensed with a little more care, the divide may not have been quite so conspicuous.

The good and excellent certainly outweigh the mediocre, although admittedly a quarter of the one hour output could probably have been trimmed without negatively impacting in any way.

Section.80 is a must for Kendrick Lamar enthusiasts, and a definite for any hip-hop fans keen to avoid the stereotypes churned out Ad nauseam through the 21st Century.

The first three tracks and Chapter Six nail their intention without wasting a syllable, while Keisha’s Song, Rigamortus and HiiiPoWeR remain among the young rapper’s finest work to date.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Hip-Stir: Scotty B saves the day + new song

Welcome to another hip-stir fellow Peace Warriors! A little story about my good friend Scotty B, and a treat at the end of the video. Picture ten little children standing around me and Scotty sat on his Cajon drum as you listen to it.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Ukulele – Stand By Me & spontaneous rap

I decided to have a little jam on the Uke, this is the sound that came out.

For more shenanigans check out the Dom K YouTube channel!

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Straight Outta Putney

In a special review segment, Dom Kureen got in touch with 90’s hip-hop almanac Sam Cox to discuss the finer points of recently released N.W.A biopic “Straight Outta Compton”.

DK: Hello Sam; as a musician who grew up heavily influenced by 1990’s hip-hop, what are your overriding thoughts about “Straight Outta Compton” the movie?

SC: The film was visually impressive, obviously sounded good but felt weak. I imagine it’s what 50 Shades of grey felt like on the big screen to all those female minions of the novel.

The casting was relatively strong, but do you think having Ice Cube & Dr Dre producing might have affected the portrayal of certain key players?

I don’t think the casting was strong. Dre was well represented. He’s always been in the background and doesn’t shout about things media wise – he came across as you’d expect. Ice Cube clearly had no issues with his son playing him, but watching was a reminder that his Dad can actually act a lot better than Junior. “Boyz ‘n’ the Hood” was special. Eazy was poorly represented – the dude was nuts in real life!

Ice Cube and son - only one is blessed with acting and rap skills, although both have very chubby hands.
Ice Cube and son – only one is blessed with acting and rap skills, although both have very chubby hands.

For anyone not familiar with this era of hip-hop what/who would you recommend as essential listening?

Cypress Hill got me going. DJ Muggs is for me the best beat maker of that period. Rugged and natural – uses real beat samples; loops not just hits. Somehow the Hill clicked like the Prodigy back in the UK. I remember watching the video of Snoop’s “What’s my name?” when rap video was starting to kick off. That tune killed it – all of a sudden there was a focus on the west coast of the states

Why do you think the early 90’s seemed to produce so much amazing rap compared to the present day?

It was fresh back then. James Brown’s funky drummer gave groups like Public Enemy and N.W.A a starting point for percussion. The rest followed for a good decade but sadly thinned out. These days it’s fake drum sounds – sounds apparent in the 80’s, which is cool, but I’ve yet to hear them transfer well onto a track.

Sprinkle some shoddy vocals about one’s demeanour, and some new age R ‘n’ B and It’s a recipe for the masses. I guess the thing is the masses seem to lap things up without complaint these days and who can blame them? Hip-hop is now more a state of mind than a movement.

In a perverse way is a lot of what N.W.A discussed even more taboo in 2015 than it was in 1991?

Quite the opposite, but sadly not much seems to have changed. It’s been static for so long that the hip-hop we hear in 2015 seems designed for stagnation. God only knows the effect that has on young black Americans. There was a time just before the ‘net when (Talib) Kweli, De La Soul, Mos Def, the Roots et al threatened to break through… then came Pirate Bay and Kanye West.

Now all I can gauge is a strange blur of hip-hop and R ‘n’ B. Neither seems to represent anything other than MTV. Drake can suck my balls.

N.W.A

Kanye West is a clumsy rapper, but an excellent producer and self-publicist!

He’s the next President.

 

Do you think people’s progressively shorter attention spans aligned with the on-line nature of music has spelled the end for really exciting underground record releases?

Yeah man, absolutely. Gone are the days of record shopping – guys are screwed on UK high streets these days. I spend most of my time now in New Look recommending dresses for my girlfriend. Ten years back she’d be commending me on my new knee high socks and Mobb Deep album. The underground is still there, it’s just a lot further beneath the surface, and ironically easy to find.

Did you ever wear a large clock around your neck?

No, but I did have Nike tick ear studs. They don’t sell those in New Look.

Straight outta Putney!

Doesn’t get much more ghetto than SW15.

Can you throw out a couple of lesser known hip-hop tracks from that time that people wanting to learn about the scene should listen to?

Here are a few;

 

And finally; with regards to the film, how many stars would you give it and how would you sum it up?

Two stars… The film does nothing for the era that was. I remember smuggling N.W.A cassettes upstairs when I was 7, getting friends round and listening to them. Good times. Hip-hop progressed almost magically for a decade after that. When N.W.A split there was genuine excitement to see who was going where.

Straight Outta Compton is now showing across the UK, apart from in the Commodore cinema in Ryde on the Isle of Wight, which will receive the film reel in late 2038.

Sam Cox:
Dom Kureen:

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Spoken Word: Jobsworth

Having written more than 30 poems/raps that I consider decent, I remain reluctant to stick too much footage online as the live performance is always a large part of my sets.

Still, just because I love so many of you, I thought I’d share a poem called ‘Jobsworth’ about being stuck in a place where you’re not really content – be it logistically, in terms of employment or even the people you surround yourself with.

PS: Please excuse the Crabbies sunglasses, it was for an audition and I’ve snipped the intro off to get straight into the meat of the poem.

Love and lyrics,

DxK

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Interviews with Creative Minds. No.5: Jason Cox

Jason Cox is a fine specimen of a man, with his musical stylings and silver tongue delighting audiences all over the country. Could the great man cope with an interrogation from DxK? Click the link to find out!

The interview features a brace of JC’s tracks from his recently released album ‘Diamond In The Rough’ (Kureen review:) and all links to the artist are at the bottom of the page.

 

To get in touch with Jason, simply click the links for his Facebook or SoundCloud accounts.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Interviews With Creative Minds. No.4: Dylan Kulmayer.

The fourth instalment of the ‘Interviews With Creative Minds’ series features 17 year-old rapper Dylan Kulmayer, also known as DRK. 

The interview also includes two tracks from his recently released debut EP, Retroverted PropulsionPlease click here for a link to the full EP and here for a link to the artist himself.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Interviews with Creative Minds #3: Will Treend

The third in the ‘with creative minds’ series features Transcendental Meditation teacher Will Treend.


To contact Will about TM, or check out his website for more info…
Visit his website 
Email: yachtshambhala@hotmail.com
Phone: (01983) 404560

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.