Tag Archives: review

Alternative Website of the Week: OSW Review

Wrestling; was it really acceptable in the 80’s? The various versions of Calvin Harris’ original track that accompany episodes of Old School Wrestling (OSW) Review would seem to suggest so.

The brain child of Dublin based trio Jay Hunter, Steve (Mr. OOC) and Steve (V1), OSW Review is a roundtable podcast cut to video footage. In their own words the trio chronologically critique old WWF (now WWE) Pay-Per-Views

Rock Austin WM17

There are hilarious segments aplenty, such as What Bar, where viewers/listeners are asked to send in their ideas for what chocolate bars or food wrappers certain wrestler outfits resemble. These work particularly well whenever ‘Macho Man’ Randy Savage is involved.

It’s not only action within the squared circle that the crew appraise though, with a selection of Simpson episodes and mixed bag of films placed under the microscope – No Holds Barred, starring Hulk Hogan, stands out courtesy of the wrestling tie-in and some comically terrible acting!

There’s a popular merchandise section of the site, with popularity snowballing hastily during the past few years, assisted by an endorsement from the globally successful Botchamania website.

Eye-popping visuals, slick editing, serene artwork and a prime selection of music (often contributed by fans), combined with the chemistry of the hosts, ensure that all of the podcasts are top-notch, so even if you’re not particularly enamoured with professional wrestling you’ll likely be impressed by the presentation.

 

Linkage

Visit the official OSW Review website by clicking here!

Like the OSW Review Facebook page!

Let Jay Hunter know that Kureen sent you and get 0.01% off any merch shipping fees!

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

September Playlist: Music Reviews

Jonathan O’Shea serves up his monthly musical musings for Kureen readers to consume in the September playlist – make sure to let us know your opinions in the comment section below!

Sapokanikan – Joanna Newsom

Airfix-light, playfully plinking piano opens a wrought tale about the colonisation of a Native American settlement that preceded Manhattan. The accompanying video, evocatively directed by Hollywood hot-property Paul Thomas Anderson (‘There Will Be Blood’, ‘Boogie Nights’, ‘Magnolia’) follows Newsom as she strides purposefully across New York, a little like the rootless wanderer played by Greta Gerwig in ‘Frances Ha’; her long skirt billowing along to the parping brass flourishes.

Always charismatic and idiosyncratic in equal measure, the Californian harpist here showcases her imaginative take on events that have shaped NY’s Greenwich Village across the years. A distinctly (inevitable comparison alert!) Kate Bush-esque manic crescendo brings this typically unorthodox, but vivid ballad to its conclusion. Though it follows a familiar formula, the bouncy lightness and engaging lyricism of ‘Sapokanikan’ whets the appetite for Newsom’s upcoming new material.

‘Divers’– a double album – is her much-anticipated fourth LP, which follows in the autumn.

 

One Thing – Roots Manuva

As befitting a man named Rodney, Roots Manuva is unafraid to use prosaic and everyday imagery to illustrate his complex, thought-provoking rhymes.  Following his past declaration of affection for cheese on toast (‘Witness’); scrambled eggs and Walkers crisps are name-checked in this potent latest track.

Money is the ‘one thing’ on Roots’ mind here. A veteran of social commentary from his South London stronghold, he pointedly comments on the obscenity of the social welfare situation while paradoxically dreaming the consumer dream (of Lamborghinis and snakeskin bikinis). Dark, hypnotic production by Switch lends a sense of urgency to the message from the genre-defying instigator.

Fresh from the festival scene and supporting Blur at Hyde Park this summer, a re-energised Roots Manuva releases new album ‘Bleeds’ in October.

 

Snakeskin Deerhunter

Self-styled U.S. indie darling, Bradford Cox, has recently been dabbling in acting (‘Dallas Buyers Club’) and his ongoing solo project, Atlas Sound. But his most revered work comes as part of the fluid 4/5-piece band, Deerhunter. They return with new album ‘Fading Frontier’, concocted in the group’s hometown of Atlanta this year.

“I was born already nailed to the cross” is a killer opening line, if one which is hardly indicative of a sprightly clap-along tune such as this. The sinuously-delivered lyrics to ‘Snakeskin’ appear to be autobiographical – perhaps referencing the lead singer’s unusual adolescence (illness and isolation) and/or his recent unfortunate collision with a car. Funky, melodic and highly accessible; this track offers a good entry-point into Cox’s weird and wonderful world for those who are yet to experience its munificent pleasures.

Deerhunter will return to these shores in October/November; with gigs in Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Brighton and London.

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Also recommended this month

 

Gratitude – Talib Kweli.
Hip-hop mastery; inciting us to ‘Fuck The Money’ (but not literally, that’d end messily).

Bodies – Farao.
Soaring and strident stuff from the “Scandi indie-folk goddess”.

Woman’s Work – U.S. Girls.
Like a demented Santigold. Sample YouTube comment: “This is some next level shit!”

Written by Jonathan O'Shea

A keen student of sport, music and life. Can generally be found educating small people, bitterly damning Aston Villa's latest attempts at football, or writing nonsense about ephemera.

EP Review – Ba Dow II

Fresh from their white-hot main stage set at the Bestival, the increasingly impressive Ba.Dow have released a new three track EP entitled Ba Dow II, Dom Kureen gives his feedback on the emerging blues-rockers’ latest output.

 

 

King of riffs Sam Morris’ influence is evident from the inaugural shred of Ba Dow II lead track Get Up, Get Up – undoubtedly the cleanest, least burdened composition of Ba.Dow’s embryonic career.

The guitarist’s captivating apéritif expertly blends with Jodie Amos’ velvety vocals and a chorus that is distinctively anthemic. Indeed, it is during the latter that there is a hint of homage to Queen’s We Will Rock You, with a thudding crescendo hurtling from the speakers courtesy of guitarist Morris and bassist Bradley McGinty’s (to date) lesser witnessed support articulations.

Lyrically the track ostensibly divulges a narrative of lost love and resentment from the perspective of the party responsible for terminating romantic liaisons; an impenitent aura of ‘fuck you, get over it’ granting a veneer of unbridled authenticity to proceedings.

Extending that theme, Help Myself fixates upon a moribund relationship in need of resuscitation, or perhaps more pertinently to be put out of its misery.

Although not quite in the ‘instant classic’ bracket of the EP’s opener, an addictive melody makes this another toe-tapper that should keep hardcore fans satiated without drifting too far from the bands’ archived material.

IOW Festival 2014 Ba.Dow

Concluding cut Realise allows Amos to further exhibit her range, adroitly unfurling a husky resonance in her voice, assisted by an unpredictably arranged landscape that eases towards a simple, buoyant bridge.

Culminating with a glorious string of “la-la’s”, the sanguine nature of the final piece extends an apt metaphor for a band that seem to be gathering momentum rather rapidly at the moment, and while critics may infatuate upon a dearth of lyrical acuity, advocates will counter that this is one of the charms of their early work, which steadfastly refuses to accommodate cliché.

Certainly this is an EP that will leave fans salivating at the prospect of Ba.Dow’s first full length album, having sampled an Hors d’Oeuvres that provides a more than palatable taster to be going on with.

One magnificent track and two notable ones make Ba Dow II a recommended purchase for Kureen readers.

Click —-> here <—- to purchase Ba.Dow II and —-> here <—- to listen to Ba.Dow’s SoundCloud.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Album Review: Black Keys – Turn Blue

A spate of high-profile album releases has seen the UK chart summit change hands with frequency this month, one of those to sit atop the pile briefly was The Black Keys‘ ‘Turn Blue.’ Dom Kureen investigates…

Black Keys 3

For their latest album, Midwestern dyad, Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney, A.K.A ‘The Black Keys’, enlisted the assistance of production guru Danger Mouse, widely acknowledged as the driving force behind the blues-rockers’ seminal LP ‘El Camino’ in 2011.

With that in mind, it was perhaps inevitable that the seven-time Grammy award winning Keys’ eighth studio album would carry expectations of further unremitting expansion – a fact not lost in the shuffle of construction, with heavy doses of hitherto scarce psychedelic punctuation serving as a thread from whence to bind the eleven-track composite.

The turbulent spirit of inaugural ditty ‘Weight of Love’ serves as a mouth-watering aperitif, with intricate guitar looming atop a sorbet of unpredictable percussion.

Continuing that alluring trend, the initial decadence of ‘In Time’ soon transforms into a breakneck voyage through unlikely dimensions, carrying a whiff of early ‘White Stripes’ towards its denouement.

Other stand-out morsels arrive in the shape of raw title track ‘Turn Blue’ and the album’s most elegant gift, ’10 Lovers,’ the former of which struggled to make an impact on the French and American singles billboards earlier this year.

Full of serenades to happier times, this latest slice of idiosyncratic inventiveness from Ohio’s finest export since Halle Berry gratifyingly vanquishes any pre-issue apprehension devotees may have harboured.

Already a contender for album of the year gongs en mass, ‘Turn Blue’ remains faithful to the Black Keys’ previous creations, whilst garnishing it with a welcome prescription of hallucinogen straight from the heaving bosom of Mother Ayahuasca.


Despite fears to the contrary, the irrepressible Black Keys have struck gold once again with a release that continues their uninterrupted rise. 

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Album Review: Michael Jackson – Xscape

Jacko’s back!… Well kind of. After a five year wait, Michael Jackson’s first posthumous album of original material was released earlier this month, Dom Kureen shares his thoughts.

Michael Jackson

Speculation that hundreds of his unreleased MP3 recordings were locked in a vault filtered out during the immediate aftermath of Michael Jackson’s passing on June 25, 2009.

One popular fable suggested that the ‘King of Pop’ had held back a host of his freshest cuts in order to release them after his 50-date O2 arena residence concluded in early March the following year.

Despite the conjecture, the silence was deafening.

Almost five years down the line, the recent release of the Timbaland/LA Reid produced ‘Xscape’ means that Jackson has joined the likes of Tupac Shakur, Ray Charles and Aaliyah in having posthumous commercial success.

The eight-track LP begins well enough, with the album’s plat du jour, ‘Love Never Felt So Good,’ a Justin Timberlake fuelled duet that yields a simple melody weaved around punchy instrumentals.

That early optimism is soon little more than dust in the rear view mirror, dislodged by a mass of indulgent and lazy synthesised production clichés that never hint at fulfilling the early promise.

In truth, a compilation of recordings deemed unworthy of lesser Jackson albums such as ‘Invincible’ and ‘Dangerous’ were never destined to set the world alight, particularly with half a decade of hype and rumour-mongering placing them on a quixotic pedestal.

Even with that caveat, the forced ‘Do You Know Where Your Children Are’ and monotonous ‘Loving You’ are almost entirely worthless.

Title track ‘Xscape’ is at least defiant in its message and assuredly blends a sweet harmony with provocative bursts of resentful rhetoric. In spite of these fruitful elements, the chief after taste is a stale one and symptomatic of the album’s overall malaise.

Michael Jackson tribute

Providing thinly veiled padding, the impotent ‘Chicago’ and ‘Slave to the Rhythm’ are complimented by the equally benign ‘Blue Gangsta,’ which rapidly fades into plodding tedium following a vocally dynamic opening burst.

The deluxe edition supplements eight studio embellished melodies with their original counterparts, which, in a colossal condemnation of the combined prowess of Messrs Timbaland and Reid, are far more liberated than the heavily burdened revisions.

Virtually every organic element of what could have been a half-decent eulogy has been removed, their vacancies seized by a veneer of dated, apathetic din.

As a result this is little more than a sweaty McDonald’s hamburger in music form, courtesy of a pair of cack-handed butchers with all the credibility of former S Club 7 singer Hannah Spearritt applying to headline ‘Night of The Proms.’

It’s a crying shame that Jackson’s former mentor, Quincy Jones, didn’t fancy stepping up to the plate,  although his abstention was retrospectively a wise one.

A commercially successful hatchet job, ‘Xscape’ will line a lot of already deep pockets, but leave fans feeling numb. 

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Album Review – Pharrell Williams: Girl

Pharrell Williams is set to take his place on the jury of the ‘The Voice’ in America. It caps a whirlwind 18 months for the 41 year-old singer/producer. Dom Kureen pays homage by sharing his opinion of the white-hot maestro’s latest solo album, ‘Girl.’

Pharrell Williams 2

For Pharrell Williams 2013 was something of an annus mirabilis. Collaborating with the likes of Daft Punk, Robin Thicke and Azealia Banks ensured that the former Neptunes and N.E.R.D front man rarely drifted from the spotlight.

Eight years after hitting the solo scene with the widely panned ‘In My Mind,’ the ageless star launched his follow-up LP having morphed into a bonafide A-lister during the interim, with ‘Girl’ reaching the summit of the album charts in no fewer than eleven countries.

Striding into earshot with the typically addictive strains of ‘Marilyn Monroe’, a recent single release, it’s clear from the outset that fans are in for an annoyingly catchy stroll along melody lane. The casting of Kelly Osborne for background vocals provides an unexpectedly inspired addition to the track.

The steamy silhouette spawned by ‘Gush’ leaves little to the imagination, with dirty beats and suggestive lyrics that only cease during a synthesised string-dominated bridge that temporarily alleviates the steaminess.

‘Happy’, part of the ‘Despicable Me 2′ soundtrack, has been a staple of radio waves and YouTube videos during the past couple of months, yet remains the album’s inspirative calling card, temporarily transforming Williams’ sweet counter-tenor into a decadent slice of Cee Lo Green.

Also noteworthy is the tightly hooked ‘Gust of Wind,’ a composition boosted by the unmistakable accent of French electro duo Daft Punk. Recounting a self-effacing tale of romance, this surely warrants a single release.

Amongst the easily absorbed harmonies are inevitably a couple of self-indulgent miscues.

‘Lost Queen’ is an absurdly dull love letter that rarely advances beyond glorified artist ejaculation and is little more than the gristle on the pork chop.

‘Brand New’ is a notch or two superior, although the inclusion of Justin Timberlake serves only to accentuate the shortcomings in Williams’ falsetto by placing him alongside a more sophisticated practitioner.

A-lister: Pharrell has made huge strides since N*E*R*D.
A-lister: Pharrell Williams has made huge strides since N*E*R*D.

Even with those two unnecessary additions, there’s enough variety dispersed over the eleven tracks to make ‘Girl’ a worthwhile purchase.

If you’re not a fan of this tweak of direction, there are hints of Pharrell’s former life as a Neptune in ‘Hunter’, a song which flagrantly borrows its baseline from Diana Ross and contains an almost identically laid out rap interlude to Debbie Harrie’s ‘Rapture’ confabulate.

An album most notable for threaded sexual undertones and elaborate orchestration (credit for the latter goes to master composer Hans Zimmer,) ‘Girl’ delivers a decent, if not superlative, addition to the singer’s ever expanding body of work.

  Pharrell’s bandwagon continues apace, with another worthwhile release.

 

 

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Album Review: Lily Allen – Sheezus

Five years after ‘It’s Not Me, It’s You’ hit the shelves, Lily Allen has returned with her third studio LP, ‘Sheezus.’ Dom Kureen takes a gander at what all the fuss is about.

Lily Allen

“Somebody remind me where I am, Miami or Timbuktu? Did I ever tell you my uncle’s monkey ran away from the zoo?”

The elementary opening burst of Sheezus’ most captivating harmony, ‘Air Balloon’ extends an apt metaphor for an album of succinct simplicity and unmistakeably transparent intentions.

With its throbbing, carefree waves, the Shellback/Allen collaboration provides a snapshot of Lily’s blissful existence since her real world evolution from Ms Allen to Mrs Cooper.

Where ‘Air Balloon’, ‘Our Time’, Take My Place’ and the lively ‘As Long As I Got You’ sparkle is their brazenly innate authenticity, rising above tacky insults or staged malevolence.

In stark contrast, the dismally maudlin and horribly titled ‘L8 CMMR’ serves as a misguided attempt to recapture the naïve, indignant spirit of the artist’s inaugural LP, ‘Alright, Still.’

Rude Girl: Lily often plays up her wild child tag.
Rude Girl: Lily often plays up her wild child tag.

Likewise, ‘URL Badman’ provides little more than tedious animus towards fans who dare to question the validity of Allen’s credentials, with some unjustly citing her famous father, Keith, as the driving force behind a prosperous entertainment career.

Additionally, the track contains an almost unfeasibly lousy instrumental section, which sounds as if the singer let her 15-month old daughter, Marnie, bash around on a sticky 1985 Casio SK-1, rather than hiring Greg Kurstin to implement his notoriously lavish production values.

‘Close Your Eyes’ is a minor improvement, but still falls deep into filler territory, with strung out sentimental mush only likely to curry favour with hubby Sam Cooper and a few diehards.

Title track ‘Sheezus’ similarly has its moments, but is too dependent upon crude pop-culture references to warrant a spot on any future ‘best of’ compilations.

Thankfully, the nostalgia sodden ‘Life For Me’ feels less affected, with an unravelling recollection of personal growth. Painting a portrait of contentment, the tune borrows much of its baseline from Paul Simon’s ‘Graceland’ and seems in conflict with spikier cuts elsewhere.

Having leapt straight to the summit of the UK album charts, ‘Sheezus’ is destined to provide financial and commercial dividends for Lily Allen. There’s enough decent material to warrant an £8.99 iTunes outlay, even if it all feels a fraction flat in the looming shadow of two previous knockout EPs.

If you’re intent on stumping up the bucks, do yourself a favour and dig £2 deeper for the deluxe edition, where the handful of supplementary bonus tracks offset some of the overplayed concepts elsewhere.  

 

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Live Review: Kyle Eastwood Band

Dom Kureen spent the weekend at Ventnor Arts Festival taking in the sights, smells and sounds. On Friday night it was all about jazz, as Kyle Eastwood rode into town!

3992525821_14a1dfd86a_oA fresh bouquet of Merlot and atmospheric, sooty glaze in the air ensured that Ventnor Arts Festival’s marquee stage momentarily drew parallels with Ronnie Scott’s jazz club in London during it’s mid-1970’s, Ella Fitzgerald fuelled pomp.

Friday night’s headliner was Kyle Eastwood, replete with his four-strong band of brothers, who brought a host of invigorating covers and original compositions to the Isle of Wight’s increasingly creative seaside resort.

The eldest son of legendary film actor/director/producer Clint Eastwood, the frontman has happily sidestepped lazy, convenient and misguided aspersions of a nepotistic bunk up since his emergence on the jazz scene in 1990, with his brand of blues, bebop and boogie ensuring escalating acclaim over the course of 24 years and six studio albums.

The evening’s melodies fluctuated between ostensibly ad-libbed bursts and flawlessly executed eulogy, the latter of which was evident in a delicate rendition of Herbie Hancock’s ‘Dolphin Dance’ and galvanising, trumpet-laced adaptation of Horace Silver’s ‘Blowing The Blues Away.’

An addictive riff and high-tempo instantly guaranteed that one of the band’s newer tracks, ‘A Night In Senegal’ was well received – Martyn Kaine’s cartilage-juddering percussion rattled the awning, as Eastwood traded his double-bass for a lesser-seen lime green electric guitar.

Intoxicating jazz: Kyle Eastwood and his band were worthy Friday night headliners
Intoxicating jazz: Kyle Eastwood and his band were worthy Friday night headliners

There was still time for the saccharine dusted ‘Letters From Iwo Jima,’ soundtrack to Eastwood senior’s movie of the same name, which commenced unobtrusively via the gentle chimes of Andrew McCormack on the piano and gripping strains of bass guitar courtesy of Eastwood, now on his third different instrument.

As folk filtered away from the venue, one thing remained crystal clear amongst the gabble – a collective spike in energy, created by the joyful chalk pit of lustrous offbeat melody played out before fans old and new.

Kyle Eastwood and his band continue to evolve apace, providing a rush of adrenalin to those fortunate enough to witness their live act. It seems implausible to feel burdened after being graced by their captivating brand of calypso-jazz.

 An exhilarating jazz tour-de-force.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Cate Le Bon: ‘Sisters’ (Single review)

Our chief music man, Jonathan O’Shea, has been busy taking in the new sounds recently. This time he turns his attention to folky Welsh singer-songwriter Cate Le Bon’s latest release ‘Sisters.’

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An ever-more sleek and sinuous stage presence, Welsh troubadour-ess Cate Le Bon returned from a recent US sojourn with a new look and refined sound; evidenced on her third album, ‘Mug Museum’, where the beguiling ‘Me Oh My’ ploughed fertile folksy terrain and ‘Cyrk’ took a tender step towards a new direction. Released on the Wichita label – this was a tighter, more coherent set.

‘Sisters’ is both recognisably inventive and comfortingly strange, but Le Bon’s signature sound has certainly matured and is more satisfyingly direct here. Her renowned vocals – often erroneously likened to those of the Velvet Underground’s Nico – are as sumptuously enunciated and dexterously delivered as ever, while H. Hawkline’s frantic, insistent keys drive the track through to a thrillingly demented climax.

‘I won’t die, I’m a sister; I won’t die!’ is the immortal resolution declared throughout, as Manics collaborator Le Bon laconically unfurls lines like: ‘She will set my hands on fire/ hands on fire over again/ her to me and me to them’.

That swirly, hooky keyboard input and a punchy, pulsing drumbeat underpins four minutes of delightfully off-kilter lyricism from the pencil of an underrated songwriter.

Stepping out of the shadows: Cate Le Bon is destined for big things.
Stepping out of the shadows: Cate Le Bon is destined for big things.

All the while, it’s impossible not to consider the influence of one-time tour-mate St Vincent on this ascendant ‘alternative’ star-in-the-making, as she journeys from her early career of melancholic folk meanderings to today’s peppy psych-pop gems.

‘Ah-ooh’-ing all over the crazily kaleidoscopic outro in typical fashion, Cate Le Bon presents a fully-formed potential hit, which could raise her profile far above and beyond her sterling work with the Manics and Welsh alt-doyen Gruff Rhys. It’s an attention-grabbing paean to sisterhood, which should insinuate itself into any self-respecting indie summer playlist.

Written by Jonathan O'Shea

A keen student of sport, music and life. Can generally be found educating small people, bitterly damning Aston Villa's latest attempts at football, or writing nonsense about ephemera.

Kelis: Rumble (Single review)

Jonathan O’Shea returns with a review of the latest cut from Neo-Soul, hip-hop Diva Kelis, Rumble, the second helping from recently released album ‘Food.’ 

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Black. Keys.

Immediately, those are the two words which leap out from the speakers as the intro to this Kelis comeback slides incongruously ear-wards. Only when she hits us with the opening line does it become apparent that this tune isn’t another from the non-stop hit factory of the boys from Akron, Ohio.

Incidentally, Kelis will share the stage with the authors of ‘Next Girl’, to which ‘Rumble’s intro bears at least a passing resemblance, at the much-awaited Latitude festival this summer.

The laid-back, tumbling brass refrain also recalls Mark Ronson’s mid-noughties output, as the ex-Mrs Nas (or Ms Rogers, or whatever she puts on her library card application form these days) departs markedly from the floor fillers of previous release ‘Flesh Tone’.

On the second release from new album, ‘Food’, Kelis grudgingly ‘welcomes’ a spurned lover back into her life: ‘I’d just got used to my space’, she laments before regretfully documenting their troubled joint history.

Naturally, she then dredges up the requisite melodrama we expect from one of pop’s most eccentric spirits, conflictingly belting out: ‘Baby, don’t go!’ in her trademark raspy soulful holler.

Kelis has never had a no.1 UK single, can 'Rumble' remedy that?
Kelis has never had a no.1 UK single, can ‘Rumble’ remedy that?

She eventually resolves: ‘I’m so glad you gave back the keys’, but it’s all a little underwhelming lyrically and lacks the innovative bite we’ve come to expect from this relative veteran of the R&B-pop scene.

It’s a long old time since Kelis so compellingly yelled “I hate you so much right now!” into the waiting abyss, so it’s natural that her style should progress, if not exactly mellow.

The reviews for ‘Food’ are predominantly positive – the strutting ‘Jerk Ribs’  is a more promising taster for what’s to come – so it’s far too early to fear that the milkshake has soured.

Those whose appetites are not satiated by this new direction should seek out the Breach remix, which more resembles her earlier output and tellingly has more YouTube hits than the original mix.

Written by Jonathan O'Shea

A keen student of sport, music and life. Can generally be found educating small people, bitterly damning Aston Villa's latest attempts at football, or writing nonsense about ephemera.