Tag Archives: Walter

Gurning twat shoots animals for sport

He had wanted to shoot an elephant, but couldn’t find one large enough to satisfy his blood lust. Walter James Palmer didn’t let that stop him though, making do with the consolation of firing arrows into a lion named Cecil, who had previously been a popular member of a Zimbabwean national park.

Kureen sources have discovered that Palmer, a dentist from Minnesota, paid somewhere between $55,000 and $70,000 to shoot the large cat, who had become notorious for his affable nature and relish of human contact.

In an attempt to sidestep the law, Dr. Palmer hurried through some seriously sketchy hunting permits in exchange for the sizeable outlay upon arrival in Africa, securing the services of a team of trained hunters who agreed to lure the animal half a mile from the park using bait, initially wounding it and returning a day later to finish the job during a pursuit that lasted for around 40 hours.

Palmer pleaded ignorance when questioned on the subject of his unlawful killing during an interview with a Colorado based news agency;

“In early July, I was in Zimbabwe on a bow hunting trip for big game. I hired several professional guides and they secured all proper permits. To my knowledge, everything about this trip was legal and properly conducted.

“I had no idea that the lion I took was a known, local favourite, was collared and part of a study until the end of the hunt.

“I relied on the expertise of my local professional guides to ensure a legal hunt.”

Palmer and co. contravened park regulations on at least two counts; animals cannot be killed within a five mile radius of the park and may not have their collar (usually fitted with a microchip) removed – The hunters had removed his collar to prevent tracking of their cherished game.

Below are some images of Palmer’s previous handy work.

Government approved groups are allowed a limited number of permits each year to hunt individual species, but in certain impoverished nations, where more value is often placed upon monetary gain than the lives of sentient beings, the system is regularly duped.

The reason why bow and arrow killings are so appealing to hunt enthusiasts is two-fold; the stealth of the method allows for less detection, and the arrows themselves are more difficult to trace than a bullet, even then it is difficult to determine that the person in possession of the bow in fact shot the offending arrow.

Ricky Gervais Vs Hunting 

Of course Palmer is not alone here. In one high-profile case earlier this year, a woman named Rebecca Francis uploaded pictures of herself laying next to a dead bull giraffe that she had killed, with her smug conceit and Twitter assertion that she was “grateful to be part of something so good” antagonising a host of social media spectators.

One of those was comedian Ricky Gervais who Tweeted: “What must’ve happened to you in a previous life to make you want to kill a beautiful animal & then lie there next to it smiling?”

Francis, like Palmer, pleads her innocence, claiming that the animal was close to death, with the flesh subsequently used to nourish starving locals, and the bones utilised for art work.

Noble indeed, although a series of latterly published photos involving the same woman beaming in the vicinity of various other trophy kills is incongruent with such philanthropic assertions.

What do you make of Walter Palmer’s actions and hunting as a sport in general? Leave us a note in the comment section below.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

50 Greatest British sports stars of all-time: 20-11

In this penultimate instalment of the series, Kureen gracefully glides towards the upper echelon of the British sporting elite.

To view the first three parts click on the links below;
50-4140-3130-21

20: Sir Walter HammondWalter Hammond

A world-class batsman, inspirational captain, brilliant fielder and tidy, albeit reluctant, medium paced bowler, Hammond appeared in 85 Test matches, compiling an at the time Test record individual score of 336 not out, despite losing years of his career to the second World War.

In addition to his cricketing prowess, Hammond made a handful of appearance as right winger for Bristol Rovers, but in spite of his obvious footballing talent only had eyes for cricket. A glittering 20 year international career finally ended at the age of 43, although a rivalry with the legendary Sir Donald Bradman bred a life-long inferiority complex.

19: Tony McCoy

The 2010 BBC sports personality of the year has won 19 consecutive Champion Jockey titles, and more than 4,300 races all told.

Particularly adept at riding poor horses to unlikely victories, McCoy continues to excel into his 40’s, showing no sign of retiring from the saddle any time soon.  At 5’10” he also stands considerably taller than most jockeys, making his success all the more improbable.

18: Johnny Wilkinson

Kicking the winning drop goal for England at the 2003 Rugby World Cup made Surrey born Wilkinson an instant national icon at the tender age of 23.

Injuries blighted his career throughout, but he still managed to play 91 Tests and score a record 1,169 points for his country. He represented Newcastle Falcons with distinction for 12 years, before a 5-year spell in France with Toulon culminated with Wilkinson leading his team to two cup final wins in his final brace of competitive appearances.

17: Jim LakerJim Laker

Laker’s long-standing first-class bowling record analysis of 19 for 90, achieved against Australia in 1956, is unlikely to be bettered, and amazingly came just weeks after the spin bowler had taken all ten wickets in an innings against the touring Australians in a  warm up match against his county side Surrey.

A Yorkshireman, Laker never actually represented his native county due to settling in London following World War II, instead forming a deadly spin-combo with Tony Lock for both club and country. His record of 193 Test scalps at 21.57 apiece places him firmly among the great tweakers.

16: Dame Kelly Holmes

Inspired by Steve Ovett, Holmes began her competitive athletics career at the age of just 12, winning the British girl’s 1500m the following year. By 1988 she had turned her back on the sport to join the army, only returning to the track four years later.

A succession of debilitating injuries appeared to have denied Holmes gold medals at the major games, until in 2004, at the grand age of 34, she produced nerveless, perfectly paced runs to take gold in both the 800 and 1500 metre races. Holmes later admitted that she had contemplated suicide during the darker days, citing meditation as a practice that transformed her life.

15: Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean

Few sports people have ever come close to emulating the popularity of Torvill and Dean, who came to national prominence when they scored 12 perfect 6’s on their way to Olympic figure skating gold in Sarajevo in 1984.

Turning professional later that year (rules prohibited them from earning any money from skating if they wanted to perform at the Olympics), the duo choreographed a series of successful musical shows on ice, before returning to the pro arena a decade later to take bronze in Lillehammer.

14: Sir Christopher Hoy

The most decorated cyclist of all-time is an 11-time World champion, six-time Olympic champion, and Britain’s most successful Olympian, leading team GB out for the 2012 Olympic opening ceremony.

A legendary sprint cyclist, Hoy’s individual success carried over into team cycling, where he represented various teams, most notably ‘Team Sky’ in 2008. Never one to rest on his laurels, the Edinburgh born 39 year-old turned his attention to motor sport in 2014, belatedly announcing his intention to compete for Nissan at 24 hours of Le Mans in 2016.

13: Sir Bobby Charlton

The creative catalyst for England’s 1966 World Cup glory remains one of the world’s most beloved sporting figures almost half a century after his career zenith.

The 1958 Munich air disaster deprived Manchester United of a slew of their exciting ‘Busby Babes’ squad, with Charlton himself considering retiring from the game due to the trauma. Thankfully for United and England he didn’t, going on to become one of the finest number tens the world has ever seen, with the Ballon d’Or awarded to him at the end of the same year that he held the Jules Rimet trophy aloft.

12: Daley Thompson

At a time when the original A-Team was in its prime Britain boasted its own action man in Daley Thompson, a muscle-bound decathlon competitor who struck gold at both the 1980 and 1984 Olympic games, breaking the world record for the event on four separate occasions.

That his feats often go overlooked in the nation’s sporting annals is possibly testament to a lack of perceived conformity, most notably when Thompson whistled his way through the national anthem whilst stood atop the podium in Los Angeles in ’84.  

11: Sir Ben Ainslie

The most successful Olympic sailor of all-time, Ainslie won silver at his first games in 1996, aged just 19, this would be his last time tasting defeat on the grandest stage, with gold following at the next five Olympics to go alongside his 11 World titles.

Sir Ben Ainslie

More recently Ainslie was hailed as the mastermind behind Oracle Team USA’s stunning comeback to win the 2013 America’s Cup 9-8, the Brit providing an unlikely remedy to the team’s warring crew and hefty fines as they turned around a seemingly insurmountable 8-1 deficit.

Tomorrow we delve into the top 10. Who made it? Who missed out? Why the need for so many questions in the closing paragraph? All will be revealed tomorrow.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.