The Distraction War

The war on drugs continues apace, with a split between those championing a further crackdown and others who think it’s all a bit of a hullabaloo, Dom Kureen gives his two cents.

Psychedelic alien
Drugs are bad Dom!


T
he sentiments were well morally virtuous but misguided on a plethora of levels, as my girlfriend caught wind of my past experiences with Ayahuasca, a psychedelic medicine first reported by 16th Century Christian missionaries from Europe, who encountered South Americans using it and described it as ‘the work of the devil.’

Renowned for its healing powers, the brew, also known under the names Yage and Daime, acts as a hallucinogenic compound of the Tryptamine family – notorious for creating insightful, enlightening states of mind.

Where my former flame showed naïvety was in stating with certainty a debunked generalisation and refusing to acknowledge alcohol, cigarettes, preservative packed fast foods or prescription medication as ‘drugs,’ a view endorsed by the majority of mainstream media and a government whose best interests are served by demonising anything that falls outside of their constitution.

In addition, to claim that all of these illegal substances are ‘bad’ expressed an innocently jaded outlook, one that had been propagated for the benefit of big pharmaceutical companies, who bring a gargantuan chunk of change into the current system.

Albert Hoffman: creator of LSD is considered the Godfather of psychedelics.
Albert Hoffman: creator of LSD is considered the Godfather of psychedelics.

 

In September, 2012, Channel Four conducted their own experiment: ‘Drugs Live:  The Ecstasy Trials.’ In which 30 people from various backgrounds and cultural dispositions were taken to a medical lab on two separate occasions – alternately ingesting a placebo pill and one containing 83mgs of pure MDMA (the subjects were kept in the dark as to which was the active drug.)

Although it was difficult to gauge the credibility of the trial, due to the controlled doses administered and prohibitive conditions, 29 of the 30 people tested (including a vicar, actor, drug counsellor and novelist) found that their overall experience was a positive one.

The sole individual who reported negatively about the experience was a former S.A.S soldier who admitted that in retrospect he had resisted what he perceived to be a forced, artificial state of consciousness as a result of his ingrained training.

Mind-set plays an intrinsic role in the value of all medication; it’s the reason why sugar pills and empty capsules have cured ailments such as headaches, anxiety and nausea in the past.

Matters of the mind also account for why alcohol, tobacco and sugar are widely regarded as ‘safe’ staples of society, despite accounting for so much illness and death.

Alcohol is at the forefront of more than 8,000 deaths per year in the UK, whilst psychedelic drugs are linked to fewer than 20 – still, a person who can quaff copious amounts of booze is often revered, while one who sporadically dabbles in hallucinogens is too freely labelled a junkie.

‘Vice’ is a website that promotes a regular ‘On Acid’ series, in which an individual swallows a tab of Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and goes to an event under the influence, with a camera crew documenting the narrative that unfolds as a result of this enhanced mental state.

Although, as with the Ecstasy Trial, the forced settings are probably not conducive to getting the best from Albert Hofman’s mellow yellows, it is a brave/foolhardy form of journalism that makes for engaging viewing.

The problem with heavily regulating psychedelics and other drugs is that it inevitably results in a surfeit of street vendors, who have been known to cut their products with household cleaning agents and other toxic ingredients that are far more harmful than a properly regulated batch of the desired prescription would be.

There are also ‘legal highs.’ These usually involve self-proclaimed kitchen chemists taking an illegal drug, slightly tweaking the atomic structure and printing some fancy packaging to take it to market, often with tragic consequences – bath salts were one such drug that set off psychosis in dozens of users and were the at the root of an array of  horrific, cannibalistic scenes.

McDonald's: Legally pump out their interpretation of food.
McDonald’s: Legally pump out their interpretation of food.

Then there’s the modern strand of Desmorphine, known on the streets of Russia as ‘Krokodil’, a lethal concoction of codeine, paint thinner, gasoline, hydrochloric acid, iodine and the red phosphorous from matchbox strike pads.

A cheap alternative to heroin, the home-made substance is injected into a vein and rots flesh from human bodies due to its toxicity. There are some graphic videos regarding this on YouTube if you think you’ve got the stomach for it.

Of course ad-libbed substances like these are destructive and addictive, but their rise is largely a result of tried and tested drugs being unobtainable, unless one decides to deviate from the prohibitive laws currently in place (which you shouldn’t, obviously.)

While Kureen.co.uk certainly isn’t endorsing the easy availability of ALL drugs, it does feel that, in light of MDMA’s promising track record as a tool for therapy, it could certainly be beneficial to experiment further with it under controlled conditions.

Cannabis oil is another potential remedy that has tons of research to suggest that it could provide a legitimate cure for some forms of Cancer and all manner of other illnesses. Sadly although it is legal, anything relating to ‘weed’ is too demonised in many people’s eyes for it to be considered a feasible option when burning the illness away temporarily is still a viable alternative.

Prescription: GP's are free to dish magic pills out at their own discretion.
Prescription: GP’s are free to dish magic pills out at their own discretion.

Ketamine, Marijuana and some forms of DMT obviously have benefits far beyond what many are aware of. It is when they are abused that they become a danger, nonetheless they’re all worth trialling extensively.

When you consider the data that’s readily available, the hackneyed phrase of “drugs are bad” is fuelled by ignorant conjecture. It only accounts for communique almost entirely reliant upon half-truths. This phoney fear mongering continues to serve its purpose, to distract the spooked masses from corruption elsewhere.

The war on illegal drugs is portrayed as fundamental to the sparing of dozens of victims each year…

And the conflicts that sacrifice millions of innocent lives just happen to be easier to lose in the shuffle as a result.

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Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

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