Tag Archives: Ventnor

Ventnor’s quirkiest shop a paradox for visitors

A QUIRKY Ventnor business, which opened just weeks before the first Covid lockdown kicked in, is challenging perceptions of visitors to the town.

Paradox Island, based on the High Street, is the brainchild of local artist, ‘Paradox’ Paul Woods.

Working in the 1980s as an architectural model-maker, Paul transitioned into props and special effects for advertising, television and film.

He later moved to the alternative scene in Berlin, where he lived for 20 years.

Paradox Island was opened in 2020 on Ventnor’s High Street.

Paradox Island is ‘two shops in one’, offering both a copy and print service and ‘trash-art’ gifts, made on the premises.

Paul said: “The shop is like Marmite — people tend to love it or hate it.

“Mainly, I buy things from charity shops and modify them in a simple but often confounding way. For instance, replacing Batman’s head with a household utensil.

“Most people giggle, some are curious enough to come inside, and some absolutely don’t get it.”

Paul opened the shop in March 2020, with his joy fleeting as he faced lockdown later in the same month.

The shop stocks a range of eccentric and eye-catching items.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This meant his vision of providing a shared space for Island artists, workshops, events, and Ventnor Fringe events, was placed on indefinite sabbatical.

Rapidly plotting a ‘Plan B,’ he made items to fill the shop, and occupy his mind during the sudden burst of free time.

Among the comments Paul has overheard from passers-by and customers are “very bizarre things in there,” “strange stuff” and “we’ll know where to come when we want to scare the grandchildren next time.”

More positive feedback has included: “the Isle of Wight’s Banksy,” “genius” and “this is the best shop in Ventnor.”

Paul is urging people to give something different and potentially provocative a whirl by visiting Paradox Island.

The shop opens from Tuesday to Saturday, 11am to 4pm, with contact details available online at www.paradoxisland.com

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Fringe benefits for Ventnor as live performances receive acclaim

THE eleventh annual Ventnor Fringe festival splashed its usual spectrum of eclectic arts onto the town’s landscape last week.

Having first been held in 2010, the event was postponed last year as a result of the pandemic.

Among wide-ranging entertainment on offer, Billy Nomates delighted a sold-out Harbourside crowd on Tuesday night.

The singer’s oft deadpan and unapologetically anarchic eloquence stuck two fingers up at the conformity of routine, invoking the spirit of throwback rebellion-fuelled punk.

Billy NoMates. Credit Chris Drums.

Particular highlights were the explosive No and melodic Emergency Telephone – the latter providing floaty vocals as a juxtaposition to lyrics venomous in undertone.

A breathless, exciting performance from this wonderfully exciting musician received a fully deserved, prolonged ovation from an appreciative audience who braved strong gusts to ensure, in contrast to her name, Billy was on this evening embraced by hundreds of mates.

Comedian Lou Sanders, best known for her live stand-up performances and appearances on a slew on popular television shows such as Taskmaster and QI, performed in the Magpie Tent later on the same evening.

Another sell-out, a circa 45-minute developmental set exhibited the comic’s natural timing, with a predominantly youthful audience enjoying watching the process in action.

Mention of her dating life provided the apex for an unpredictable performance which seemed to fly by.

Comedian Lou Sanders. Photo credit: Ventnor Fringe.

Inevitably with such fresh material, there were occasional flat-liners, although these were heavily outweighed by the seasoned comic timing and spur of the moment observations synonymous with an intoxicating artist.

In particular, Sanders – no relation to former talk show host Larry despite rumours to the contrary – was at her prickly zenith when deviating from the (literal) script in conversation with members of the audience.

There was a further shot of high-profile comedy on Saturday evening, as Ali Woods dusted off his award-winning chops for a stand-up show inside Ventnor Arts Club.

The 2020 Hackney Empire New Act of the Year is a captivating storyteller and has the vital ingredient of being able to gradually pace narrative towards an explosive conclusion.

Woods was a little unfortunate the audience included a handful of children, meaning he was forced to tone down the set slightly and avoid a couple of jokes, and he would benefitted from a larger venue.

Comedian Ali Woods.

Nevertheless, his cocktail of self-deprecating anecdotes, pandemic observations and a thread surrounding mental illness made this arguably the most rewarding comedy performance of the entire week.

Ali told Kureen: “I loved performing at the Ventnor Fringe for the first time! The locals are wonderfully friendly even if they walk a bit slowly.

“I performed in two shows so I think I managed to perform to everyone in the town! I cannot wait to be back — lovely place, lovely people.”

The ratings…

Billy NoMates:
Lou Sanders:
Ali Woods:

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Review: Navy Knickers and Nicked TVs

Joan Ellis and Donna Jones MBE, aka ‘Them Two‘, shared 90 minutes of stories, poetry and performance pieces for a sell-out audience at the Winter Gardens during this year’s Ventnor Fringe festival on the Isle of Wight.

Donna Jones MBE
Donna Jones MBE

Donna, an accomplished wordsmith who had an illustrious career as a youth worker in the North-West of England, indulged attendees by traipsing around a slew of amusing subjects, including growing up with embarrassing parents (her Dad’s false teeth once scuppering the embryonic stages of a flirtatious liaison with a dishy waiter.)

Donna’s Mother (“the first feminist in Barnsley”) featured prominently in many of her anecdotes, heralded as a woman of great sass who retained the upper hand in her marriage.

Poems such as ‘The Miner’, ‘Blackpool Revisited’ and ’38DD’ were all delivered with requisite gusto from the lips of a bold performer who has been at the forefront of Isle of Wight spoken word and female rights issues for the past several years.

The two ladies intertwined their spirited but very different sets, an effective tool in keeping the show fresh throughout; each segment was kept brief by design, so the audience never had time to get too attached to one person’s material.

 

Joan Ellis spoke with great passion about her daughter, Sophie, who was present. Much of her material clearly derived from motherhood.

Joan navigated through various highlights of her career and personal life, displaying a penchant for storytelling – retrospectively musing on her time at the top end of the copy writing industry – as the voice of an animated dog amongst other things.

Joan and daughter Sophie
Joan and daughter Sophie

Highlights included an encounter she enjoyed with an aesthetically appealing young man in the 1990’s, whose contact details she was unable to pluck up the courage to take down. The next time she saw him was on television, as he turned out to be Neil Morrissey from Men Behaving Badly!

Switching back and forth again, Donna’s Buckingham Palace related material provided a shift of comedy gears, with every punchline hitting its intended target, most notably a deliciously disgusting description of one youngster as “the kind with hands down his trousers and offering you a crisp!”

Joan concluded the show with a captivating 8 minute monologue based on the death of Marilyn Monroe. It was crisply delivered, but could perhaps have been placed earlier in the afternoon to play out to a fully charged peanut gallery.

A well oiled show from two seasoned speakers, both of whom bounced off each other with great ease and organic chemistry, without it ever feeling overly rehearsed.


In a nutshell

+ A sell-out crowd aged anywhere from 12-72 were left feeling they’d had excellent value for their £6.50 ticket.

Donna Jones MBE’s website is available by clicking here.

Joan Ellis is live on Vectis Radio every Friday and Saturday from 1-2pm, click here for the link!

 

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Review: Lairy Tales and Crappy Ever Afters

Baps; we all admire them and we’re liars if we claim otherwise. Whether of the savoury or fleshy variety, there’s a diversity of shape and flavour fit to tantalise even the most discerning of palates.

Unruly Baps

The Ventnor Fringe festival gave curtain call to its final venue of 2016 with a show of rich imagination and tireless expression, courtesy of Lady Baps (Sarah Palette) and Unruly Scrumptious (Eljai Morais), collectively known as Unruly Baps.

A full throttle spectacle divided into seven segments, each containing frenzied farce, with the majority pulling in members of an appreciative audience (although nobody sat in the front row, perhaps wary of becoming part of the show.)

During the opening monologue Unruly Baps described what was set to unfold as “several tales told by two idiots”, as the duo bickered and adorned their bonces with the first of a throng of wigs utilised throughout the evening.

Unruly Baps

The inaugural fairy tale spoofed was Cinderella, which involved Unruly Scrumptious modernising the tale through an extensive and absorbing poem in an impressively legit northern twang.

This scene also gave Lady Baps an opportunity to exhibit her penchant for physical comedy; carrying the action element of the piece with relish, her facial expressions and change of tone brought life to the Cinderella story, with a final twist in the tale for good measure.

Keeping the pace brisk, a “feminist five minutes” called for a volunteer from the audience, but with nobody forthcoming, a man named ‘Liam’ was plucked from one of the back rows (he must have thought he’d be safe in the cheap seats!) He instantly got into the spirit of things with some sharp rebuttals as the ladies had their way with him… So to speak.

These brief fragments between the main action were an effective tool in ensuring proceedings flowed without the threat of a lull or crowd burnout.

More swift changeovers came into play before “Three fairy tales in an unspecified amount of time”, where Scrumptious played needy fall guy to her savvier sidekick, at one point being repeatedly sprayed in the face with water.

Additional volunteers were chosen, some more eager than others, as the regular breaking of the fourth wall guaranteed that patrons felt as if they could become part of the show at any given time. The fairy tales concluded with cackling laughter from the two ladies, who stared into space behind the audience with the sort of maniacal expressions usually reserved for American Idol contestants – it was reassuringly absurd in the most delectable way.

Unruly Baps

With the bar raised so high by these opening exchanges, the next couple of chapters fell a little flatter.

A tribute segway was short and sweet, but didn’t add an awful lot to the production, save for a few audio clips of David Bowie, Prince et al. A black and white silent movie of Rumpelstiltskin followed – a fantastic idea in theory as a deviation within a live show, but it was a tad too lengthy and one paced to be considered unblemished in execution.

Happily the denouement offered a hilarious rendering of Little Red Riding Hood, where the Grandmother was revealed as a slutty former squeeze of the wolf. It brought the house down and received a much deserved standing ovation to close the show.

Both performers exhibited an exquisite range of acting dexterity throughout the evening, with the unscripted aura a testament to not only their ability as actors, but also the skill to keep an audience captivated at the end of a long week at the fringe. This was a worthy headliner.

In short

A superb show, performed and written by two very talented women. A couple of scenes dipped when held against the lofty standard that book ended the night, but on the whole it was memorable for all the right reasons.

 

To find out more about the show and Unruly Baps in general click the links below!

Unruly Baps
Lady Baps
Unruly Scrumptious

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Sound Bites – free gig tonight!

Isle of Wight residents are in for a treat tonight, with Bendula Bar hosting Sound Bites – a showcase for local spoken word and musical talent. The three-ish hour gig, which kicks off at 7.30pm, is part of Visit Isle of Wight‘s Acoustic Isle event, and the brainchild of Ryde based artist/poet/author/lovely lady Donna Jones MBE (See vid below.)

Who the funk is on the bill?

As well as the afore mentioned Ms Jones, there are a host of young poets from the Red Tie Theatre and Flip The Script, plus some of the local scene’s cutting edge musicians; artists whose arrival centre stage has ushered in new musical genres to define their stylings, stud muffins who make Syd Barrett look like a monk.

The Ventnor Darlings are one such band, they’re definitely from Ventnor, but are they darlings? My lips are sealed.

The Ventnor Darlings: The John and Yoko of the IoW (bed not pictured)
The Ventnor Darlings: The John and Yoko of the IoW (bed not pictured)

Admission is free and food and drink are available, so all of your basic survival needs are covered, and you don’t even have to spend any of your hard earned coin, just sneak off to the toilets and drink water straight from the taps if you get dehydrated, and smuggle in a Fruesli Bar for the interval.

Seriously though, get involved. Nights like this deserve a packed venue, those performing are doing it for the love of their art, and not monetary gain… and you can always catch up with Eastenders on the iPlayer later!

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Max Lyrical at Ventnor Fringe

On Friday, 15th August, a collaboration of the finest talent from the Isle of Wight and beyond make their way to the south coast’s answer to Edinburgh’s esteemed Fringe Festival for the deliciously titled Max Lyrical.

Based in the seaside town of the same name, the Ventnor Fringe Festival has expanded substantially since its inception in 2010, with the woodland area (which hosts the show), a hauntingly captivating backdrop for the spoken word and music that will be on offer.

Here’s the low down on some of the acts that will be performing at Max Lyrical.


DJ Nipsy

– Plays throughout the night –

DJ Nipsy

“He’s unlike any other DJ I’ve heard” Sam Cox, a member of Putney’s RMS recording studios told me upon first stumbling upon ‘Nipsy’ during a fluke encounter after the 2013 Isle of Wight Festival.

After a short sabbatical, he returns at Max Lyrical, expect amazing beats throughout from the king of the deck-dub-math-pop-step genre!


Dylan Kulmayer

– Spoken Word/Rap: 20.10-20.30

Dylan Kulmayer

When I was 17 years of age my mindset frequently switched between subjects as taxing as how many spots I had and how harsh life was as I quaffed apathetically on Perrier water and smoked salmon.

At the same age, Dylan Kulmayer, aka DRK, has recently released his debut EP and, perhaps more tellingly, refuses to go near Perrier, content to slum it with Evian. His lyrics are also wise far beyond his years and his EP received the thumbs up from Kureen.co.uk


DxK

-Spoken Word: 20.30-20.45

Maxx Lyrical

If DxK following DRK isn’t confusing enough, this gem also goes by a slightly different version of the gig name, Maxx Lyrical, on special occasions (Bar mitzvahs, weddings etc.)

Infeasibly handsome and with an IQ of 239, the young stud from parts unknown would be Russell Brand’s meditation partner if ever the two crossed paths.


Ba.Dow

– Music: 20.45-21.10

Ba.Dow

Like a scene from the original Batman, Ba.Dow’s name crashes through the air each time it leaves somebody’s lips, rendering any surrounding pigeons temporarily incapacitated.

Having won the 2014 Bestival competition, this is the start of an exciting journey for a rich sounding band with virtually unlimited upside.


Unannounced act

– Rap/Spoken word 21.30-21.45

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‘Unannounced act’ often refers to a deep panic behind the scenes, as every prospective wordsmith or person owning a beret is urged to spout some words in front of an audience for a few minutes.

That’s far from the case here – Indeed, the organisers have booked… Um… Dave, no wait, DJ Petrolhead. Well, there is someone booked and he/she is bloody marvellous, even the Isle of Wight Country Pamphlet and Joppul Junior site would be impressed!

 

Donna Jones MBE

– Spoken Word: 21.45-22.00

 

Of all the MBE’s I’ve known Donna Jones is the finest. Her gritty, honest, colourful poetry should provide the ideal contrast to some of the potty mouthed shenanigans elsewhere.

A published poet, Donna offers a welcome change of tempo to the gig and brings decades of decadent rhetoric to the table.


Buddy Carson and Emmy J Mac

– Spoken Word/Music: 22.00-22.30

Buddy and Emmy
You can’t have a spoken word event without Buddy and Emmy. Well, you can, but it wouldn’t be anywhere near as good.

The headliners are the perfect blend of silky lyricism and ear trembling melodies. Anyone who hasn’t heard Emmy J Mac live and in living colour is in for a treat, her voice is one of the finest to emanate from these shores.

The gig promises to be a special one, get your buttocks over. At £8 for two tickets (2-4-1 deal with Ventnor Fringe) it’s an absolute bargain.

Do you know what else costs £8? Carrot Top’s new DVD – Carrot Top! So, if you don’t come along then you’re basically supporting the flame haired twerp by default.

To purchase tickets for the show either phone Ventnor Fringe on 0843 289 8718 or book via their website.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Live Review: Rich Hall


In the final of our Ventnor Arts Festival reviews, Dom Kureen shares his opinion of American comedian Rich Hall’s sold out marquee stage performance.

 

Rich Hall 2Devotees lined up beyond eyeshot of the entrance, serving as merited recognition for one of America’s most enduringly popular comedic exports of recent years.

The dry, caustic wit of Rich Hall, a humorist synonymous with English panel shows such as ‘Q.I’ and ‘Eight Out of Ten Cats,’ was immediately evident amid an opening broadside at cheese manufacturers Kraft and their hostile takeover of Cadbury.

Transitioning neatly into politics, the real life Moe Szyslak referred to Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich as a couple of glove puppets, consequently shifting his attention to Nick Clegg and David Cameron (“The key cutter and the shoe maker at a struggling Cobblers!”)

Some tongue-in-cheek contrasts between British and American customs were followed by an uproarious skit relating to the trials and tribulations of the world’s greatest trampolinist, Alexandre Moskalenko, who, despite years of dedicated endeavour, still probably doesn’t get noticed in his own neighbourhood.

Encouraging audience participation, Hall chatted to ‘Andy,’ a rose grafter (no, me neither) whose story warranted an ad-libbed ditty, replete with catchy guitar riff.

That breakneck train of thought proved a pivotal weapon in the armoury, with some other members of the front row less forthcoming when spoken to, although a couple of the on-the-spot compositions admittedly fell a little flat.

Lookalike: Rich Hall referred to himself as a "real life Moe Szyslak" (centre)
Lookalike: Rich Hall referred to himself as a “real life Moe Szyslak” (centre)

The variety and authentic warmth of the comedian’s act should guarantee that no two shows are quite the same on this latest sojourn across the British Isles.

More valuably, Hall’s impish aura, which never broached guttural, indicated that there was enough edgy material in reserve to keep things diverse.

A highly amusing parody of a modern day Bob Dylan concert wrapped up his Isle of Wight leg of the tour agreeably, with bounteous guffaws emanating from all corners of the temporarily erected canopy.

 The £16 admission fee was a bargain for a terrific night of comedy.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Live Review: Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain

Dom Kureen was kindly allowed a press pass for the recent Ventnor Arts Festival – On Sunday the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain hit the strip.

Ukulele Orchestra of GBCorny gags and jaunty cover versions were abundant, as the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain serenaded a sold out Ventnor Arts Festival marquee on Sunday evening.

The 8-piece ensemble, now in their 30th year of live performances, entered the fray composed of seven ukulele practitioners and a single bassist, a set-up consistent since 2005.

In a move that added instant lustre to proceedings, the half a dozen male members took to the stage adorned in black-tie attire, with the two female acts in chic evening dress.

The stimulating nimble ‘Hollywood,’ based on Richard A. Whiting’s 1937 ‘Hollywood Hotel’ soundtrack, got things off to a flyer and was played in tribute to Marilyn Monroe.

Shifting gears, a startling cabaret depiction of Prince’s 1980’s boudoir tour de force, ‘Kiss’ gave the first hints of a tongue-in-cheek theme that ran for the show’s duration.

 

‘Get Lucky’ was given a new lease of life, despite the Daft Punk/Pharell Williams collaboration having already spawned several dozen increasingly naff covers. This effort bypassed the stigma of cliché with a fresh glaze of silliness, including a host of animal noises and on-stage shape cutting.

Missing the mark, a parody of Kate Bush’s ‘Wuthering Heights’ became painstakingly hokey in parts and a couple of overly rehearsed gags played out to a handful of reticent courtesy chuckles.

Thankfully, the purity of ‘Dancing Barefoot’ got things back on track, capturing the spirit of Patti Smith’s canticle without breaking stride.

The engaging ’32 Bar Blues’ and convivial ‘Should I Stay or Should I go’ provided a buoyant close to the gaiety, with the string octet receiving not one, but two lengthy standing ovations.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Live Review: Roger McGough – As Far As I Know

Roger McGough visited Ventnor, Isle of Wight for the Isle of Arts Festival last weekend, promoting his newly published book of poems ‘As far as I know.’ Dom Kureen was on the scene to take in a one hour show from the man dubbed ‘the patron saint of poetry.’ 

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Roger McGough strode to the podium of the marquee stage like a contented Yogi after an extended meditation session, his entrance theme a rapturous cacophony of enthused applause and sporadic yelping.

The bar was set high before a syllable had been uttered, although this kind of reception is nothing outlandish for one of Britain’s most revered wordsmiths, following almost half a century of articulate ode.

Time has only supplemented the poignancy of McGough’s sentiments – ‘A cure for aging’ and ‘A good age’ both revealed his personal introspections regarding the anxious inevitability of getting older, whilst ‘Let me die a young man’s death’ provocatively jabbed at the futility of a peaceful passing.

Large sections of the show resonated with a predominantly sexa-octogenarian demographic that ushered the venue’s attendance towards it’s 400-seat capacity.

Signing on: The poet was happy to sign for the fans.
Signing on: The poet was happy to sign autographs after the show.

The fickle nature of mortality continued to prove a fertile source of material, with some of the afternoon’s loudest pops evident during and after the hilarious ‘Carpe Diem’ and sinister undertones of ‘I am not sleeping.’

Tributes to Charlie Chaplin, Carol Ann Duffy and Enid Blyton ensured that tolls were paid and heroes respected in a one hour set that served as a ‘greatest hits’ composite for a leading light of the spoken word genre.

The pacing of the gig might not have been to everyone’s taste, but the fact that the post-show book signing was halted prematurely due to all works of literature selling out was testament to the enduring popularity of the 76-year old.

Even after that, the author continued to sign scrap pieces of paper, ticket stubs, crisp packets and whatever else people could dig out to be inscribed, McGough seemingly having the time of his life throughout.

 

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.

Live Review: Ayanna Witter-Johnson

Dom Kureen was at the Ventnor Arts Festival last weekend to check out a host of performances – on Saturday he was present to witness Ayanna Witter-Johnson in action at Ventnor Arts Club. 

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Perhaps the most engaging act at this year’s Isle of Arts festival came courtesy of one of least assuming of all the venues utilised.

Charming and buzzing with bright-eyed vitality, 28 year-old cellist, pianist and singer, Ayanna Witter-Johnson, was an unlikely fit for the Ventnor Arts Club, with its dim lighting and lounge session ambience.

Paradoxically the two unlikely worlds meshed exquisitely, like shiny new shoes gracing worn out feet, with the artist making her second Isle of Wight stopover within 9 months, following an appearance last August at Ventnor Fringe.

Opening her 70-minute set with a serene translation of Bill Withers’ “Grandma’s Hands” was a bold move that instantly presented an unaffected vocal capacity, with the eager cello, named ‘Reuben’ for reasons never divulged, gathering vigour as the melody progressed.

The woman behind the cello: Ayanna Witter-Johnson hasn't ruled out a return to the Isle of Wight in the near-future.
The woman behind the cello: Ayanna Witter-Johnson hasn’t ruled out a return to the Isle of Wight in the near-future.

‘Flowers’ yielded a leisurely, comfortable composition that insinuated deep-rooted compassion, without ever threatening to trigger much emotion from listeners.

The issue here was a disconnect between entertainer and audience, caused by the piano’s situation necessitating a Miles Davis-esque cold shoulder, with Ayanna now facing away from her admirers.

The calibre of the music on offer remained indisputably excellent despite that minor blip, with the moving ‘Ain’t I a woman’ suggesting shades of a post-Fugees, pre-exile Lauren Hill. The tender grazing of Reuben’s strings created a captivating contrast with the potent verbal delivery.

The highest spots were reserved for the second stanza, with a positively haunting take on The Police’s ‘Roxanne’ and the seductive ‘Unconditional’.

The former’s inaugural sequence was so unapologetically melancholic, that it was easy to temporarily forget the original existed at all. It soon matured into a goose bump inducing, chilling ride that needs to be heard live in these reverberating acoustics to be fully appreciated.

Ayanna was kind enough to pose with Reuben for a few snaps!
Ayanna was kind enough to pose with Reuben for a few snaps!

Concluding with the finger plucked, soul tweaking ‘Black Panther,’ Ayanna assuredly stated: “My strength will be your anchor, like a black panther I’m free to roam without a keeper.”

Expect grand things from a young musician who graduated with honours from the Manhattan School of Music, subsequently winning the illustrious Amateur Night Live at Harlem’s esteemed Apollo Theatre, to follow in the footsteps of luminaries such as Michael Jackson and Ella Fitzgerald.

Comfortable in Ventnor’s diminutive venue, Ayanna will undoubtedly continue to blossom on the exalted stages she’s destined to grace.

Written by Dom Kureen

As a young rapscallion stranded on an Island, my time is split between writing, performing spoken word, wrestling alligators and delivering uplifting pep talks to hairdressers before they prune me. I meditate and wash daily when possible.